Health resources – NE Florida Counts http://nefloridacounts.org/ Sat, 14 May 2022 08:32:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://nefloridacounts.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/icon-64-150x150.jpg Health resources – NE Florida Counts http://nefloridacounts.org/ 32 32 LaGrange nonprofit provides mental health resources during Mental Health Awareness Month https://nefloridacounts.org/lagrange-nonprofit-provides-mental-health-resources-during-mental-health-awareness-month/ Fri, 13 May 2022 11:39:28 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/lagrange-nonprofit-provides-mental-health-resources-during-mental-health-awareness-month/ LaGRANGE, Ga. (WRBL) – The Calumet Center for Healing and Attachment is a non-profit organization specializing in mental health services. There is a residential program for women recovering from abuse and trauma, as well as an outpatient program. The center was launched by Program Director Kelly Camp and Chief Counselor Greta Cork in January 2017. […]]]>

LaGRANGE, Ga. (WRBL) – The Calumet Center for Healing and Attachment is a non-profit organization specializing in mental health services. There is a residential program for women recovering from abuse and trauma, as well as an outpatient program.

The center was launched by Program Director Kelly Camp and Chief Counselor Greta Cork in January 2017. Camp said the center prides itself on being an individualized program tailored to different needs. Women often make their own case plans and are supported by leaders like Camp and Cork.

“What we do here is kind of born out of passion for life experiences that most of us have had. I think those kinds of experiences have helped us navigate better because we understand,” said said Camp.

Women in the residential program are required to undergo individual and group therapy as well as meetings and recovery-oriented activities. The center is completely free for outpatients and residential patients.

Camp said the center aims for the residential program recovery process to take about a year, but that is adjusted on a case-by-case basis. She said the most important lessons women in recovery learn are the importance of communication, forgiveness and trust.

The center offers outpatient mental health services for everyone, and this program grew as the center continued to help those in the residential program after they left.

Greta Cork is chief counselor at the Calumet Center for Healing and Attachment. She specializes in addictions, substance abuse, behavioral addictions and trauma.

“You take the only way a person knows how to cope and that makes life incredibly difficult, that’s why you have to deal with the trauma and that’s what we’re doing here,” Cork said.

Cork works with patients in both outpatient and residential programs and often does eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EDMR) therapy. EDMR therapy assesses trauma and desensitizes people to the experiences they have gone through.

She said trauma memories are stored incorrectly in your brain and can be very activating; addressing these traumas is key to improving mental health.

Michele Bedingfield is the executive director of the Calumet Center and she said funding for the center has been provided by several organizations and individual donations.

“Mental illness is not something that should stop someone from moving forward. It’s like people who have high blood pressure or high cholesterol or physical injury. It can be treated and with the right care and support it can be overcome and they function as full members of society. Our goal is to help eliminate the stigma of mental illness,” Bedingfield said.

Bedingfield said the center offers child psychotherapy which is often important in treating trauma in children aged zero to five. She said the ultimate goal was always to reunite mothers with their children and teach them how to thrive in society after healing from trauma.

The Calumet Center for Healing and Attachment hosts an annual healing event called “Break Every Chain” where women share their testimonies and come together for worship and lunch. Camp said the event was meant to raise awareness and show the community that she was there to support them. Visit https://www.calumetcenter.org/ for more information.

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Mental Health Resources Described | News, Sports, Jobs https://nefloridacounts.org/mental-health-resources-described-news-sports-jobs/ Fri, 13 May 2022 07:07:49 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/mental-health-resources-described-news-sports-jobs/ Mike Bach, soon to take on the role of director of Copper Country Community Mental Health, speaks during a public program Wednesday at the Portage Lake District Library in Houghton. Bach spoke about the services offered by the organization. Bach was one of six presenters representing four local organizations focused on mental […]]]>

Mike Bach, soon to take on the role of director of Copper Country Community Mental Health, speaks during a public program Wednesday at the Portage Lake District Library in Houghton. Bach spoke about the services offered by the organization. Bach was one of six presenters representing four local organizations focused on mental health in the four county area.

EDITOR’S NOTE: This is the first in a four-part series that will explore the services available for mental health issues, including assessments, insurance and programs available in the four county area. . The second part will appear in the weekend edition of the Gazette.

HOUGHTON – A free public program on mental health services and challenges in the community, conducted Wednesday at the Portage Lake District Library, provided information on resources available for those seeking help or information about mental illness and treatment.

Speakers included Mike Bach, who will soon assume the role of Director of Copper Country Community Mental Health. He discussed the services available through Copper Country Community Mental Health.

Bach said that overall, CCMH’s treatment philosophy is community care versus custodial care.

“What I Mean By That” he said, “It’s that decades ago it was expected that if someone had a serious mental illness or intellectual disability, that person would go to an institution and live there.”

Society’s values ​​have changed over the years, evolving towards the belief that people with mental disorders should be allowed to live in the community with the same rights as those without an illness or disability. mental.

“It’s a major change,” says Bach, “and I think it’s really good.”

Bach said CCMH tries to help the people it serves in several ways: residences, community programs, and outpatient services, along with other services that he says don’t mesh well with the other three. categories.

CCMH has nine group homes that it operates, Bach said.

Its group homes serve adults with intellectual/developmental disabilities and/or mental illness who require assistance with daily activities and a structured living environment. People are supported 24 hours a day by trained staff.

Some of their residents were transferred from Newberry State Hospital when it closed in 1992, and a number of former staff from that hospital now work for CCMH.

Some of the patients, Bach said, have moved from a closed institution to life in the community, where they can go to movies or take walks.

“We give them individualized care” he said. “Different people have different needs. We are not a nursing home, although we do have nurses available to assist you.

CCMH Community Support is a program for people with persistent mental illness. Community Support provides hands-on help in the home and community, including medication management, money management, grocery shopping, and housekeeping.

“We provide support to people who – probably without this level of support, at least in past generations – would have been in an institution,” says Bach.

CCMH can provide help with everything from keeping an apartment clean so people don’t get evicted, to developing a budget and preparing a grocery and shopping list.

Medicine deliveries to get people to medical appointments are also part of the community support program.

“We can help people find work” He continued. “We can help them by volunteering. We had a group going fishing for a while – we can offer a lot of different things.

Outpatient therapy offered by CCMH includes the provision of assessment and treatment services for adults with serious mental illness or children who have serious emotional problems.

The type of help offered varies and can address family relationship issues, parent/child conflict, interpersonal and social conflict, and symptoms related to depression, anxiety, and other acute psychiatric problems. Services are offered at offices in Houghton, Calumet, L’Anse and Ontonagon.

“We’re trying to approach this from a trauma-informed perspective,” Bach explained, “That means you know a lot of the people we serve have gone through various traumas, so we try to be sensitive to that and make that part of the treatment.”

At the heart of a trauma-informed approach to care is the motivation for each patient to feel safe and welcomed during a behavioral health treatment program, according to the Georgetown Behavioral Health Institute.

In a supportive environment, patients can focus on their treatment programs and patients can progress towards recovery. While clinicians can always work to ensure a safe and welcoming environment for patients, there are specific points clinicians need to consider when implementing trauma-informed care.

“We have home-based programs for children at risk of being placed out of the home,” says Bach. “We also do prevention work. We also work a lot with people with concurrent disorders, which means that in addition to a mental health diagnosis (a person) has a substance use diagnosis.

This approach helps people recover by providing mental health and addictions treatment together.

“We offer psychiatric services” he added, saying that at this time CCMH is providing telepsychiatric treatment.

“We have worked with a company for several years and have a good relationship”, says Bach. “It’s always a challenge to keep (doctors), so we try to do the best we can.”

Additionally, CCMH also has a physician assistant on staff, as well as nurses and case managers.

CCMH’s emergency services are available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year for people with a mental health emergency requiring immediate assistance. These services include crisis intervention, pre-hospitalization screening and assessment.

“We’re trying to make the decision (of) ‘Can this person go home with their loved ones, with a follow-up plan?’ or “Does the person have to go to a psychiatric hospital to be admitted?”

Bach said frequently staff will call up to 24 hospitals and get 24 admissions refused, so the next day this process must be repeated.

“It’s not a very good situation” he said, “And that’s unfortunately a national situation.”

CCMH also offers a number of peer-led services, including peer support specialist services. These services are provided by people who are on their own journey of recovery, who have a serious mental illness and who are receiving or have received services from the public mental health system.

These specialists are hired to share their life experiences and provide consumers with expertise that professional disciplines cannot replicate. They offer a wide range of services including health integration, benefit and housing support, community inclusion, health education and recovery promotion.

There is also the visitor center at Hancock.

“We have people who have lived experience and work with parents, teens and up, as well as adults,” he said.

Other programs offered by CCMH include Nursing Home Services (OBRA/PASARR). The OBRA team works with area hospitals and nursing homes to identify and address the mental health needs of people residing in long-term facilities.

The psychosocial rehabilitation program includes the Northern Lights Clubhouse, which provides services to members using the Clubhouse model. Members who are adults with mental illness are involved in an orderly working day to operate the lodge. Focusing on the strengths, talents and abilities of members provides opportunities to increase their independence within the community.

For more information on Copper Country community mental health programs and services, visit the CCMH website at https://www.cccmh.org/agency-information.



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Norfolk mum promotes mental health resources through nonprofit after son’s suicide https://nefloridacounts.org/norfolk-mum-promotes-mental-health-resources-through-nonprofit-after-sons-suicide/ Wed, 11 May 2022 19:17:39 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/norfolk-mum-promotes-mental-health-resources-through-nonprofit-after-sons-suicide/ NORFOLK, Va. – A Norfolk mother wants to help other families struggling with mental illness after her son died by suicide. Tucker Corprew started the Chas Foundation after his second son, Chas, committed suicide at the age of 34. Corprew said Chas had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder and psychosis. “He would ski; he was […]]]>

NORFOLK, Va. – A Norfolk mother wants to help other families struggling with mental illness after her son died by suicide.

Tucker Corprew started the Chas Foundation after his second son, Chas, committed suicide at the age of 34. Corprew said Chas had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder and psychosis.

“He would ski; he was really good at sports. He was very sociable and had friends from all over. He loved music and he was a very good golfer,” Corprew said.

The Chas Foundation connects residents of Hampton Roads with mental health resources, including finding providers, support groups and other crisis intervention programs.

“Families don’t know how to navigate the maze of mental health and services,” Corprew said, “so they need someone who’s been through it, who’s overcome the odds to support them and to help.”

The nonprofit also has its own mental health help, through its Navigator program.

“The browser will take a brief history and then it’ll get an individualized course of action, where we know all the resources, so we connect you to the one we think is the best fit,” Corprew said.

More information about the Chas Foundation and mental health resources in Hampton Roads can be found here.

If you or someone you know has mental health issues and needs help, here are some resources:

  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: (800) 273-8255
  • Crisis text: Text ASKUS to 741741
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First responders silently suffer mental health issues, police psychologist says ‘Resources don’t exist’ https://nefloridacounts.org/first-responders-silently-suffer-mental-health-issues-police-psychologist-says-resources-dont-exist/ Tue, 10 May 2022 22:54:25 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/first-responders-silently-suffer-mental-health-issues-police-psychologist-says-resources-dont-exist/ RICHMOND, Va. (WRIC) – A new survey suggests many first responders in Virginia are suffering in silence when it comes to mental health. It’s a trend that Joseph Diman knows only too well. “I relive May 4th over and over and over again and what I could have done to allow Gary to be alive […]]]>

RICHMOND, Va. (WRIC) – A new survey suggests many first responders in Virginia are suffering in silence when it comes to mental health.

It’s a trend that Joseph Diman knows only too well.

“I relive May 4th over and over and over again and what I could have done to allow Gary to be alive today,” Diman said.

May 4, 2006, is the day the now-retired Chesterfield police officer saw his partner, Officer Gary Buro, die during an early morning call that ended in beatings of fire.

Diman survived after being shot five times. He said seeing those scars always brings back painful scenes in vivid detail.

“I’m going to think about Gary. I’m going to think about the smell of gunpowder. I will think about things that happened 16 years ago but, for me, it happened yesterday,” Diman said.

Retired police officer Joseph Diman stands next to a memorial honoring his late partner, Officer Gary Buro.

Diman said he returned to work as soon as his injuries healed.

“I was ready physically but I wasn’t ready emotionally,” Diman said.

Diman was later diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but it took him several years to get therapy.

“I felt at the time that I couldn’t be 100% open or honest with what I was going through because that would have been considered a weakness,” Diman said.

Fear of being seen as weak was among the top concerns cited by first responders, who said they were reluctant to seek help in a new nationwide survey into the wellbeing of public safety personnel. Others worried about the impact seeking help would have on their careers or security clearance. Some said they wanted to handle it themselves or were worried about privacy.

Preliminary results released by the Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police summarize responses from 2,635 first responders, or about 20 percent of all first responders in the state.

  • 19% received clinical scores indicating levels of moderate to severe depression
  • 20% received clinical scores indicating moderate to severe levels of anxiety
  • 12% received scores representing clinical significance when assessing PTSD
  • 21% indicated problems with alcohol
  • 8% reported having had passive suicidal thoughts (thoughts of suicide/self-harm, but no plan to carry them out)
  • 4% reported having had active suicidal thoughts (thoughts of suicide/self-harm and a plan to act on them)

Of the law enforcement respondents who received clinical significance scores, the vast majority were not officially diagnosed.

  • 69% for depression
  • 74% for anxiety
  • 73% for PTSD

The survey also showed where first responders currently access behavioral health resources, both internally and externally.

Source: National Public Safety Personnel Wellness Survey

Police psychologist Dr Jon Moss said the low rate of formal diagnosis likely reflects an unwillingness to seek help and a reluctance by professionals to label people working in public safety. He said that sometimes it can be counterproductive.

Moss said the dataset almost certainly underestimates the problem. Notably, a significant number of participants left the survey when presented with trauma-related questions, according to the report.

Still, Moss said the national effort to collect this kind of data reflects a significant shift.

“People are starting to recognize that it’s a strength to ask for help, so they’re encouraged to do so,” Moss said.

But Moss said the growing recognition does not match the current reality of police-friendly mental health resources.

“From my perspective, on the mental health side, the resources don’t exist,” Moss said.

Moss said more police departments need to start hiring mental health personnel or building close relationships with clinicians in their community to make it easier to seek help. Currently, when an issue comes to light, he said officers often don’t have a trusted person to turn to who understands the unique challenges associated with the job.

Chesterfield Police Chief Jeff Katz said the training needed to better prepare officers for and deal with trauma.

Additionally, Katz said mental health issues should be covered by workers’ compensation so recovering officers can take time off and receive more robust paid treatment.

“As opposed to just here’s a prescription, take those pills, hit the road again. We need to stop treating our staff like they’re disposable, they’re not,” Katz said.

The comments come after a recent effort to expand workers’ compensation to include anxiety and depressive disorders experienced by law enforcement officers or firefighters on the job failed in the Virginia General Assembly. .

It passed the state Senate with unanimous support, but a version of the House bill never passed the House Appropriations Committee.

Delegate Rob Bell (R-Albemarle), who sponsored the House bill, said it all comes down to funding.

“I haven’t heard anyone say they don’t like the idea, but a lot of bills get earmarked for appropriations with significant tax impact and don’t make it,” Bell said. “This problem is not going to go away, so we will definitely try to find a way to solve this problem and, if it is not the best way, we will find another way.”

With the country experiencing a shortage of public safety personnel, Katz said there was an urgent need for action.

“If we do these things, we can strengthen ourselves as a public safety infrastructure. It’s an investment and we should stop thinking of it as an expense,” Katz said.

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Tanzania: Use health resources with caution, says PM https://nefloridacounts.org/tanzania-use-health-resources-with-caution-says-pm/ Mon, 09 May 2022 07:09:59 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/tanzania-use-health-resources-with-caution-says-pm/ Prime Minister Kassim Majaliwa has directed that all the resources granted for the implementation of various health projects should be used prudently and honestly, to ensure that the intended goals are achieved, resulting in community transformation. He released the guidelines on Friday in Dodoma during the launch of the Afya Yangu program implemented by the […]]]>

Prime Minister Kassim Majaliwa has directed that all the resources granted for the implementation of various health projects should be used prudently and honestly, to ensure that the intended goals are achieved, resulting in community transformation.

He released the guidelines on Friday in Dodoma during the launch of the Afya Yangu program implemented by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID Tanzania).

The five-year program worth US$260 million (approximately 604 billion/-) will focus on the delivery of health services for HIV, tuberculosis, family planning, reproductive, maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health (RMNCAH).

“Local government authorities must provide all necessary assistance for the successful implementation of the project. This project must not be allowed to be derailed by corrupt leaders.

“Leaders should make sure they review them regularly to make sure project goals are being met and productivity is being achieved,” he said.

Majaliwa said the sixth phase government led by President Samia Suluhu Hassan has continued to prioritize the health sector by implementing initiatives aimed at increasing service delivery, particularly in the fight against HIV and AIDS.

The Prime Minister further stated that various efforts by government and stakeholders have started to bear fruit; with the implementation of the strategy to reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV has significantly reduced the prevalence rate from 13.5% in 2015 to 7% in 2020.

He said the government has made maternal and infant mortality a top priority by implementing the primary health promotion programme.

“As part of this program, we have been asked to increase the number of health facilities so that each service has one.”

“As of 2020, a total of 487 health facilities and 102 district hospitals had been built or renovated to provide primary healthcare including antenatal surgery, this is a huge achievement,” Majaliwa said.

According to him, Tanzania is now one of the few countries in sub-Saharan Africa that has largely met the United Nations requirements for providing emergency maternal and newborn services.

He mentioned access to emergency services based on population and geographic location, as well as a high rate of mothers delivering in service delivery centers as criteria.

Health Minister Ummy Mwalimu on her part thanked USAID Tanzania for helping the government improve health services in the country.

She said the organization was working with the government to fund interventions for HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, family planning, and maternal and child health, all of which will be delivered by USAID Afya Yangu projects, whose end beneficiaries are the Tanzanians. , especially those in the outlying regions where these projects will be implemented.

The United States Ambassador to Tanzania, Dr. Donald Wright said the friendship and cooperation between Tanzania and the United States continued to grow and strengthen day by day.

“With nearly two-thirds of Tanzania’s population under the age of 25, we need to strengthen local health systems to improve health outcomes for generations of young Tanzanians who will guide the country towards a more sustainable and stable future. said Dr. Wright.

Earlier, USAID Resident Director Kate Somvongsiri said the program will be implemented in 21 regions of mainland Tanzania and Zanzibar in close collaboration with the Ministry of Health, regional and local government authorities, civil society organizations, Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation (EGPAF), Jhpiego, Deloitte and consortium partners.