Community health – NE Florida Counts http://nefloridacounts.org/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 08:29:57 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://nefloridacounts.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/icon-64-150x150.jpg Community health – NE Florida Counts http://nefloridacounts.org/ 32 32 Norwest Co-op Community Health Center celebrates its anniversary https://nefloridacounts.org/norwest-co-op-community-health-center-celebrates-its-anniversary/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 07:01:09 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/norwest-co-op-community-health-center-celebrates-its-anniversary/ INKSTER INDUSTRIAL PARK A health center in northwest Winnipeg is celebrating its 50th anniversary. “Fifty years ago, our community came together. There was no support in the neighborhood, so the community started our co-op,” said Nancy Heinrichs, executive director of the Norwest Co-op Community Health Center, adding that the organization started with primary care services. […]]]>



INKSTER INDUSTRIAL PARK

A health center in northwest Winnipeg is celebrating its 50th anniversary.

“Fifty years ago, our community came together. There was no support in the neighborhood, so the community started our co-op,” said Nancy Heinrichs, executive director of the Norwest Co-op Community Health Center, adding that the organization started with primary care services. and a daycare. “It’s really community driven and we’re the only health co-op in Manitoba.

Norwest has approximately 160 employees and offers a range of services, including primary health care and a counseling unit with support for families and young people. They also have community development services at Manitoba Housing and were the first organization in Winnipeg to create a “gathering hub” where youth could connect with services and resources in one easy-to-access location.

Heinrichs, who served as executive director of Norwest for 20 years, believes the organization has grown over the past five decades because it focuses on community needs.

“When I started, there were about 32 people in Norwest, and we worked really hard to meet the needs of the community and grow,” Heinrichs said. “I stayed because our staff and board are doing an amazing job, and I loved being able to see what we could build to support our community.”

During the pandemic, Norwest helped groups make and sell face masks and developed a catering group so the organization could distribute thousands of meals to people in need.

“We try to help the community grow,” Heinrichs said. “We really focus on building capacity within our community and for our community members.”

Norwest Co-op Community Health Center celebrated 50 years with a community celebration on the grounds of Shaughnessy Park on June 20. trucks.

“It was really fun to see our community and so much of our Norwest staff come together to celebrate,” Heinrichs said. “Our services are invaluable to people, and we’ve worked very hard to get closer to where they live and where they feel comfortable. We wanted to make it accessible and for it to be a safe space.

During her tenure as CEO, two highlights for Heinrichs were the formation of Western Canada’s largest food center and the creation of her youth hub five years ago. Since then, five other sites in Manitoba have followed the Norwest model.

Now that Norwest has reached five decades of service, the organization plans to launch a Community Forum that will expand the Community Food Center to have a garden, outdoor counseling areas and a drop-in space for community members. They are also renovating a new site for counseling services and producing a documentary about Norwest.

“When I started 20 years ago and there were 32 people, I never thought that today we would be seated at 160,” Heinrichs said. “For us to have the number of programs that we have, no one would have believed it.”

For more information about the Norwest Co-op Community Health Center, visit www.norwestcoop.ca

Kelsey James

Kelsey James
Community journalist

Kelsey James is a reporter/photographer for the Free Press Community Review. She graduated from Red River College’s Creative Communications program in 2018 with a major in Journalism and holds a BA in Rhetoric, Writing and Communications from the University of Winnipeg. A lifelong Winnipegger who grew up in southwest Winnipeg, Kelsey is thrilled to cover the neighborhoods she still calls “home”.

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UAMS and Mitchell’s Park Street Pharmacy Partner to Provide Community Health Worker in Izard County https://nefloridacounts.org/uams-and-mitchells-park-street-pharmacy-partner-to-provide-community-health-worker-in-izard-county/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 15:02:24 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/uams-and-mitchells-park-street-pharmacy-partner-to-provide-community-health-worker-in-izard-county/ Enlarge image June 28, 2022 | FAYETTEVILLE — Whitney Beard, of Calico Rock, was recently hired through a partnership between the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) and Mitchell’s Park Street Pharmacy to help Izard County residents navigate the health system. As an Embedded Community Health Worker, Beard is available to answer basic health […]]]>

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Teller County Public Health and Environment Promotes 2022 Community Health Assessment https://nefloridacounts.org/teller-county-public-health-and-environment-promotes-2022-community-health-assessment/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 21:23:32 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/teller-county-public-health-and-environment-promotes-2022-community-health-assessment/ Teller County Public Health and Environment (TCPHE) is excited to announce the promotion of their 2022 Community Health Assessment (CHA). In Colorado, all local public health agencies (LPHA) are required to conduct a community health assessment every five years, which is used to create a five-year public health improvement plan (PHIP). Plans are reviewed and […]]]>

Teller County Public Health and Environment (TCPHE) is excited to announce the promotion of their 2022 Community Health Assessment (CHA). In Colorado, all local public health agencies (LPHA) are required to conduct a community health assessment every five years, which is used to create a five-year public health improvement plan (PHIP). Plans are reviewed and approved by our local Board of Health (BOH). The Community Health Assessment examines the current health status and needs of our community.

In 2017, TCPHE completed a community health assessment and plan that prioritized mental health (including suicide), substance use and abuse, injury and violence, and to access to care. Although some progress has been made in these areas, some areas still urgently need improvement. We ask for community engagement and collaboration with our community partners regarding the current state of Teller County’s health and environment and the areas our community should prioritize in 2023-2027.

We encourage everyone in the community to take the time to complete our anonymous, community-wide survey to help us identify priority health needs and understand how to make Teller County a healthier place to thrive. To access the survey, enter this in your browser: bit.ly/3I2SVcR or scan the QR code at the bottom of this article. If you do not have internet access, feel free to contact Teller County Public Health & Environment to complete a hard copy.

In addition to the community-wide survey, TCPHE, in collaboration with the Colorado School of Public Health (CSPH) and the OMNI Institute, will collect data through various resources to prioritize health needs and environmental issues. in our community. This process will involve our key community leaders, community health and social service sources. Our community will have many ways to participate in this process.

COVID-19 has been prioritized as a public health issue for the majority of the past two years. The pandemic continues to strain an already weakened health system. We can do our part and help alleviate this pressure by implementing preventative health measures and interventions. TCPHE will continue to rely on a reputable presence in our community. We will not neglect to prioritize other public health issues in Teller County. We value and welcome people of all ages, genders, races, religions, cultures and socio-economic status. Our mission is to prevent disease and to protect and promote the health and environment of the residents of Teller County by providing quality health programs and services. Join TCPHE to protect your health and embrace your future. Be a part of treating the root of health and wellness and join TCPHE with our mission to promote Live in the mountains healthily!

Take the survey using the QR code below

Let’s move forward together!

For more information please contact:

Michelle Wolff WHNP-BC, Director

Karissa Larsen RN-MSN, Public Health Nurse III and CHA Project Coordinator

Teller County Public Health and Environment

719-687-6416

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Crystal Staffney talks about community health work on Detroit’s West Side https://nefloridacounts.org/crystal-staffney-talks-about-community-health-work-on-detroits-west-side/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 04:02:16 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/crystal-staffney-talks-about-community-health-work-on-detroits-west-side/ This is part of a series of Q&A interviews with directors of Detroit nonprofits related to our Resilient Neighborhoods series. Crystal Staffney is the Deputy Director of Joy Southfield Community Development Corporation and will assume the role of Executive Director later this year. Model D: To begin, what can you tell us about your organization? […]]]>
This is part of a series of Q&A interviews with directors of Detroit nonprofits related to our Resilient Neighborhoods series. Crystal Staffney is the Deputy Director of Joy Southfield Community Development Corporation and will assume the role of Executive Director later this year.

Model D: To begin, what can you tell us about your organization?

Crystal Staffney: Joy Southfield Community Development Corporation was established approximately 20 years ago. The organization was founded by Second Grace United Methodist Church in 2001. Joy Southfield CDC first operated as a mini JSCDC HQ and CCC clinic clinic for those who were uninsured in Detroit’s 7th Ward. The mini-clinic provided health examinations and other preventive health care services such as vaccinations and immunizations. Over the past few years, we have improved our community health service and also moved into community economic development.

Model D: I’ve heard that one of your big priorities right now is to address what’s called the social determinants of health. Could you explain what this means for our readers who may not have heard of this term before?.

CS: I would define it as the non-medical aspects that affect outcomes and health risks. So I think of the circumstances and the environment in which people are born, live, play and work. It involves a wide range of health and quality of life issues.

Model D: What are the major health issues in the community you serve?

CS: I would say, food security issues; not having many grocery stores in the area or having overpriced stores. Also the inability to be able to eat healthily because of financial resources. If you have $62 to your name and five kids, it’s going to be really hard to get a healthy meal when McDonalds sells 50 cent hamburgers.

Model D: What about the most important health issues that residents face?

CS: Diabetes, high blood pressure, heart and cardiovascular problems. And I believe [their prevalence] it’s because [residents] do not have access to healthy food or do not have the resources to buy it. And that’s one of the reasons we hold our farmers’ market because we have low-priced produce. Our goal is to try to support the community with at least the fruits and vegetables they need to live healthier.

Template D: Tell us about your farmers market.

CS: As part of our community health service, we have a farmers market, which isJSCDC Farmer’s Market called sowing more and more future seeds. We generally operate from late May or early June to October each year.

The market has been around for about 12 years. We secure and retain community vendors who sell fresh produce. We also have a small business community organization as part of our market. So this year, we will start on June 7th. That is to say every Tuesday from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. In addition to our farmer’s market. We always work with Alliance Community Care. Our partnership was formed around 2012. We share space with the Covenant Community Care Clinic and they provide medical and dental services for the 7th Ward.

Model D: What other health-related programs do you offer?

CS: We have our Cooking For Change program. [it’s] led by our community chef who offers weekly healthy cooking demonstrations to our residents during the Farmer’s Market. Our chef plans, sources and prepares nutritionally sound food. He also provides different training on cooking techniques and food preparation at our Farmer’s Market. After our farmer’s market is complete, our leader travels to the community to implement evidence-based programs for our residents. This includes recipes, instructions, and also locating inexpensive ingredients to fit their budget.

[We also have] our healthy prescribing program which is a partnership with Covenant Community Care. We support patients who suffer from chronic diseases such as diabetes and congestive heart failure. We help them develop a plan and diet that will help them with their medical issues. Through this partnership, we provide Covenant Carte patients with healthy fruits and vegetables in food boxes. They have to get a doctor’s prescription, and then they come to us and we help them develop this regimen, meeting with them weekly to make sure they stay on track to achieve their goals.

And finally, we have our HEAL support group. It represents health, food, activity and learning. The support group is focused on diabetes at this time. My goal is to eventually add [residents dealing with] heart and cardiovascular disease to this program. We support people living with a disease with resource information, weekly conversations with health experts, and different incentives through the program. So that’s the aspect of community health.

Now, in terms of our community economic development, we continue to develop things and improve our program. Currently, one of our major community economic development programs is our Healthy Homes Rx program. We work very diligently with some of our partners and funders to support our residents who are facing issues at home that affect their health, which can lead to asthma and other issues. In the past we have supported residents with mold issues, lead issues, roof repairs and different things like that. This year we are working on making more repairs. [There’s] an application process, and we have a ton of residents who need support. It’s first come, first served, depending on the resources we have at the time.

Model D: Anything else you would like our readers to know?

CS: One of the major projects we are working on is finding a building to buy and renovate. One of our future goals is to create a community hub for our residents and businesses. We want [operate] a space where you can come, if you need a meeting space. We also want to be the go-to place for businesses to learn how to create proposals or different things that will benefit their businesses in the future. And, beyond that, we are looking to create a community kitchen where community chefs can come and prepare their events.

Resilient Neighborhoods is a reporting and engagement series that examines how Detroit residents and community development organizations are working together to strengthen local neighborhoods. It is made possible thanks to funding from the Kresge Foundation.

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Thrive Alabama to Host Community Health Fair Saturday – The Madison Record https://nefloridacounts.org/thrive-alabama-to-host-community-health-fair-saturday-the-madison-record/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 15:34:27 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/thrive-alabama-to-host-community-health-fair-saturday-the-madison-record/ Thrive Alabama will host its second annual Stomp Out HIV Community Festival on Saturday, June 25 from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. in Big Spring Park East in Huntsville. This free event features music, entertainment, food trucks, and more. The main stage features a variety of local artists and a Step Dance exhibit. A health […]]]>

Thrive Alabama will host its second annual Stomp Out HIV Community Festival on Saturday, June 25 from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. in Big Spring Park East in Huntsville. This free event features music, entertainment, food trucks, and more. The main stage features a variety of local artists and a Step Dance exhibit. A health and wellness fair will bring together over 40 groups and organizations so you can learn more about our community resources.

Young people can enjoy The End Zone, an exciting HIV prevention experience featuring professional athletes and local sports teams, fun activities, photo studios, giveaways and prizes. The End Zone stage will feature interactive sports and dance demonstrations.

Free HIV testing will be available in the ThriveMobile, a 33-foot motorhome designed to bring health care to the community. Rapid HIV testing is quick and easy, taking only a few minutes to get a result. Each person tested will receive a free gift.

If you do not want to get tested for HIV at the event, ask any Thrive Alabama staff member to get a test kit to take home.

Stomp Out HIV is held annually to recognize and promote National HIV Testing Day. Thrive Alabama encourages everyone to get tested for HIV, learn their status, and be connected to care and treatment if needed. Stomp Out HIV is a safe space event.

Composition of the main stage:
• Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc. (stage team)
• Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. (Step Team)
• Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc. (Step Team)
• Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. (Stage Team)
• Chelsea, who? (Singer)
• Remy Neal (singer-composer-performer)
• DMRSoul (singer-composer-performer)
• Divas of Royalty (dance)
• Madison Gems (Dance)
• Dazzlin’ Dymes (dance)
• 615 Platinum Showstoppers (Dance)
• Huntsville Community Drumline, Inc.
Also, DJ Primetime256!

Stomp Out HIV is organized with the support of the Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion of the City of Huntsville and the National Panhellenic Council of North Alabama (NPHCNA). The event is sponsored in part by Curant Health.

Thrive Alabama is a 501c3 nonprofit organization with clinics in Huntsville, Florence, and Albertville. The agency serves nearly 6,000 people with services that include adult primary health care, pediatrics, behavioral health care, treatment of sexually transmitted infections, HIV prevention, nutritional counselling, social work, etc. For information, visit prosperalabama.org.

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UAMS, Palace Drug Partner to Provide Community Health Worker in Fulton County https://nefloridacounts.org/uams-palace-drug-partner-to-provide-community-health-worker-in-fulton-county/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 13:10:24 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/uams-palace-drug-partner-to-provide-community-health-worker-in-fulton-county/ Enlarge image June 24, 2022 | FAYETTEVILLE — Trena Spears was recently hired through a partnership between the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) and Palace Drug to help Fulton County residents navigate the healthcare system. As an integrated community health worker, Spears is available to answer basic health care questions and provide education […]]]>

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UAMS and Arkansas Rural Health Partnership Partner to Provide Community Health Workers in Chicot County https://nefloridacounts.org/uams-and-arkansas-rural-health-partnership-partner-to-provide-community-health-workers-in-chicot-county/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 13:09:27 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/uams-and-arkansas-rural-health-partnership-partner-to-provide-community-health-workers-in-chicot-county/ Enlarge image June 24, 2022 | FAYETTEVILLE – Four community health workers were recently hired as part of a partnership between the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) and the Arkansas Rural Health Partnership to help Chicot County residents navigate in the health system. As Embedded Community Health Workers, Autumn Bridwell, Jana Kamal, Anna […]]]>

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East Shore District Health Dept. Hiring Nurse, Community Health Worker https://nefloridacounts.org/east-shore-district-health-dept-hiring-nurse-community-health-worker/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 19:39:05 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/east-shore-district-health-dept-hiring-nurse-community-health-worker/ BRANFORD, CT —The East Shore District Health Department, which covers Branford, East Haven and North Branford, is hiring a part-time community health worker and a full-time public health nurse. Here’s what you need to know: Public Health Nurse This position is for a full-time General Public Health Nurse and will contribute to public health education. […]]]>

BRANFORD, CT —The East Shore District Health Department, which covers Branford, East Haven and North Branford, is hiring a part-time community health worker and a full-time public health nurse.

Here’s what you need to know:

Public Health Nurse

This position is for a full-time General Public Health Nurse and will contribute to public health education. Investigating cases regarding Covid-19 and noting disease trends. The position performs assessments as needed, provides immunizations for adults and children, including flu vaccine and travel health vaccines. Vaccinate during the mass vaccination program for Covid-19. May also track illnesses, provide health education, provide Directly Observed Therapy (DOT) of TB medications, and cover general duties of the Public Health Nurse. May supervise volunteers who also conduct case investigations regarding Covid-19. A varied schedule will be required to include nights and weekends and on-call public health response duties. View full job description and qualifications HERE.

Community health worker

Part time, 20 to 25 hours per week. This is a professional position. The Community Health Worker, under the supervision of the Health Education Supervisor, will provide education, information, resources, and referrals to community members. This will be accomplished through interactions and building connections with communities, businesses and entities that serve those who live in the district. The community health worker will engage in health programs that educate and provide services. View full job description and qualifications HERE

HOW TO APPLY: Please send a letter of interest and a copy of your resume to the East Shore District Health Department at 688 East Main Street, Branford, Connecticut 06405, or email info@esdhd.org

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Community Health Worker Certification Opens Doors to Culturally Competent Care in Kansas https://nefloridacounts.org/community-health-worker-certification-opens-doors-to-culturally-competent-care-in-kansas/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 13:03:09 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/community-health-worker-certification-opens-doors-to-culturally-competent-care-in-kansas/ TOPEKA — As a deafblind interpreter in Spain, Ton Miras Neira saw the need for more health workers focused on empowering and understanding underrepresented communities. So when Neira came to the United States in 2012, he began a career as a community health worker – frontline public health workers who are either trusted members of […]]]>

TOPEKA — As a deafblind interpreter in Spain, Ton Miras Neira saw the need for more health workers focused on empowering and understanding underrepresented communities.

So when Neira came to the United States in 2012, he began a career as a community health worker – frontline public health workers who are either trusted members of the community or an unusually understanding close to those they serve. Miras embedded himself in hospitals, working in the emergency room, but he also spent time with patients in their homes, building rapport and developing more competent care plans.

Neira, who works as a community health worker project manager at the University of Kansas Medical Center, said it can ensure treatments succeed where they might otherwise fail.

“Sometimes it’s like (doctors) don’t understand why their client is sticking to diabetes medication, but the results aren’t good, and as a community health worker, you go home and you see they are still drinking sodas or they are not working,” Neira said. the community to do this.”

This year, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment announced a new certification for these health workers, the first in the state to recognize the role they play in connecting communities to health and social services. Developing the certification involved more than 40 members of the Kansas Community Health Worker Coalition and took five years.

“Having a certification process for CHWs is essential to expanding career options and future opportunities,” KDHE CHW Section Director Stefanie Olson said when the certification was announced.

KDHE said a certification working group has been established to research certification pathways and has started within the coalition’s sustainability committee.

To be eligible, residents must have a high school diploma or equivalent, although some exceptions may be made. They must also follow one of two tracks – an education track involving completion of a KDHE-approved training program and a work experience track demonstrating 8,000 hours over three years of volunteer experience.

“As we see the validation of CHWs through the certification process, more groups like the Governor’s Commission on Racial Equity and Justice will recognize the role community health workers can play in addressing gender disparities. longstanding record in health, improving health equity, and improving access to education and the economy,” said David Jordan, president of the United Methodist Health Ministry Fund.

Jordan said community health workers have been used since the 1960s, so they are not a new provider, but they have been used in different ways at the community level.

Treva Smith, care coordinator for KC CARE, described the decision as a major step in bringing Kansas to the forefront of this issue of culturally competent care.

“The certification and education is huge, so I’m very proud to say that Kansas is in the top five, at least 10 for sure, of states making progress with community health workers,” Smith said. .

Cultural Competence and Financial Benefits

Smith saw firsthand the benefits of culturally competent care in a previous role with the Kansas Breastfeeding Coalition. In some cultures, people don’t even consider breastfeeding, she says.

“Introducing something that’s simple enough for women and has huge health benefits is wonderful,” Smith said. “Safe Sleep is another. We’re just doing what we’ve always done or what we’ve seen done, but when you can talk to someone and really take that time with them, help them understand, and provide them with the resources they need to doing is a game changer.”

By integrating into local hospitals and health centers, community health workers can connect the dots and solve cultural dilemmas, bridging the gap between the health system and clients, Smith said.

Neira said ensuring adequate representation among CHWs is the first step he and his team take at KU Med, where they have nearly 60 health workers across Kansas. Before hiring someone, they check the demographics of different countries and conduct interviews based on the uniqueness of the community they seek to serve.

“We have a CSW in Finney County who is from the Afghan community, and we have CHWs who are Latino, and we have CHWs representing the African American community,” Neira said. “If you don’t have that, you don’t address the cultural barrier.”

Beyond cultural benefits, community health workers can also provide financial relief to the state by easing pressure on emergency systems, providing increased primary and preventive care, and better chronic disease management. A Penn University Study 2020 found for every dollar invested in community health workers has a return on investment of $2.47.

“They also save individual providers money because they’re able to make sure they’re providing that really important community connection to patients who don’t exist within the four walls of their clinic or their home.” hospital, which is really what drives the fact that Americans are so dissatisfied with the healthcare system,” Jordan said.

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