Community health – NE Florida Counts http://nefloridacounts.org/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 12:29:31 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://nefloridacounts.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/icon-64-150x150.jpg Community health – NE Florida Counts http://nefloridacounts.org/ 32 32 Optum Officially Opens Community Health Center https://nefloridacounts.org/optum-officially-opens-community-health-center/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 18:48:20 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/optum-officially-opens-community-health-center/ Published on November 23, 2022 at 11:48 am, Last updated on November 23, 2022 at 11:49 a.m. If you’re 55 or older, there’s a brand new resource in town. You may want to visit the new Optum New Mexico Community Center at 4010 Montgomery Blvd. NE (between Jefferson and Carlisle on the south side) if […]]]>

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If you’re 55 or older, there’s a brand new resource in town. You may want to visit the new Optum New Mexico Community Center at 4010 Montgomery Blvd. NE (between Jefferson and Carlisle on the south side) if you’re interested in yoga, Tai Chi, Latin dancing, fitness classes, movies (free popcorn!) and a number of social groups devoted to your favorite pastime.

Free. And you don’t have to belong to Optum New Mexico to join. The new community center is open to all seniors.

“A healthy community is a better community,” said Mykel Kirkpatrick, Optum’s Community Outreach Coordinator. “If we can keep people out of the emergency room, out of the doctor’s office, if we can be a gateway to health and a free resource, that’s why we’re here.”

After a soft opening last month, Kirkpatrick said there’s been a steady trickle of new members at the moment, but she expects a flood after the grand opening on November 29. From 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. that day, there will be free food and drink, as well as two mini-course sessions and health screenings for blood pressure, medications and A1C tests for diabetes. From 1 to 4 p.m., experts will give mini yoga sessions and answer questions about general health and wellness.

Pneumatic machines are gentler to use. Photo by Stephanie Hainsfurther

Great care has been taken in choosing weight machines designed for seniors. Keiser’s air resistance systems make the weight lifting motion much smoother and cause less wear on older joints. Other machines are adapted so that a person in a wheelchair can easily access them and the seats swivel to allow easy entry. There is ample space for fitness classes and comfortable places to socialize.

Their regular schedule will include a book club, conversational Spanish classes, jewelry making, a Painting with a Twist instructor, and an open sewing group to socialize while completing a craft project. There will also be a free movie afternoon with popcorn snacks. Many of Optum’s efforts focus on preventing Alzheimer’s disease and maintaining brain and social skills.

For more information: https://web.cvent.com/event/147e289c-438c-46ad-9a28-ed608f2dc108/websitePage:d1afeeb1-6e23-4f58-8118-000f520eed60

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Tower Health Shares Community Health Needs Assessment Implementation Plans https://nefloridacounts.org/tower-health-shares-community-health-needs-assessment-implementation-plans/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 11:01:07 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/tower-health-shares-community-health-needs-assessment-implementation-plans/ Earlier this year, Tower Health completed the 2022 Community Health Needs Assessment (CHNA), which identifies health priorities for its region. CHNA data was collected at the regional level and reported for each service area of ​​Tower Health Hospital. Priority areas for the next three years include: access to equitable care, behavioral health, health education and […]]]>

Earlier this year, Tower Health completed the 2022 Community Health Needs Assessment (CHNA), which identifies health priorities for its region. CHNA data was collected at the regional level and reported for each service area of ​​Tower Health Hospital. Priority areas for the next three years include: access to equitable care, behavioral health, health education and prevention, and health equity. Equitable care means the provision of care that does not differ in quality based on patient or patient group characteristics such as age, gender, geographic location, cultural background, ethnicity, religion or socioeconomic status.

“At the end of CHNA, each of our hospitals worked with their partners and community organizations to develop their implementation strategy,” said Desha Dickson, Tower Health vice president for diversity, equity, inclusion and community well-being. “The implementation strategy will guide the work we do and the programs we develop over the next three years. I think the most important aspect of the CHNA process is community partnership and engagement. Each of our community partners brings significant and unique expertise. We are much stronger together than we would be individually, and the community benefits from working together.

The implementation plan is a key part of the community health needs assessment process, as it outlines the goals for each priority community need and sets the stage for implementing strategies and initiatives that will impact health outcomes and sustain improved health status in the communities Tower Health serves.

Casey Fenoglio, Community Wellness Program Manager at Pottstown Hospital, said, “Our team is excited to share our plans for the next three years. We will develop new and innovative ideas as well as implement programs that have been successful in other hospitals and organizations.

Several strategies include:

  • At Chestnut Hill Hospital, eligible patients with transportation issues will have access to free transportation to and from medical appointments through Ride Health.
  • The Phoenixville Hospital team is working to increase access to telemedicine services. Through a collaboration with the Phoenixville Senior Center and other senior residences in the community, the team plans to offer technology education programs. Additionally, they will host events to educate about advancements in healthcare technology, such as remote patient monitoring, which translates into better access to care.
  • To help address behavioral health needs in the community, Pottstown Hospital plans to develop a psychiatric street medicine program. The goal is to treat a minimum of 40 patients and connect 30% of patients to routine outpatient therapy. Partners in this initiative include Access Services, Community Health and Dental Care and Creative Health Services.
  • Reading Hospital’s Community Connection Program will screen for Medicare, Medicaid and other at-risk populations and deploy community health workers (CHWs) as an intervention to address health disparities in populations in high-risk and vulnerable patients through the creation of closed-loop referrals to community based organizations. Program goals include completing 10,000 patient screenings per year and generating 1,200 referrals.
  • Christopher’s Hospital for Children will continue to focus on gun violence prevention to keep children in its community safe. Over the next three years, the team plans to host an annual gun violence prevention forum, distribute gun locks in partnership with Temple University, support buyout program events firearms, conduct “Stop the Bleed” trainings, and conduct firearms and gun safety screening and education. violence at the Center for the Urban Child.

Barbara O’Connor, Director of Community Health Education and Outreach at Phoenixville Hospital added, “We are fortunate to have the support of so many collaborative community partners. By connecting with other local organizations, our hospitals will be able to increase education and access to vital resources and help ensure the health and safety of members of our communities.

“A lot of time and energy is spent completing the community health needs assessment reports and implementation strategy documents,” said P. Sue Perrotty, President and CEO of Tower Health. . “I thank the members of the Tower Health team for their commitment to the health of our communities in Berks, Chester, Montgomery and Philadelphia counties. I also appreciate the continued teamwork of our community partners. By continuing to work together, we will strengthen our communities.

Tower Health CHNA implementation plans are available here:

Questions and comments regarding the Tower Health Community Health Needs Assessment can be sent to [email protected].

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Idaho State to Receive $3 Million Grant to Establish Collaborative Community Health Worker Program https://nefloridacounts.org/idaho-state-to-receive-3-million-grant-to-establish-collaborative-community-health-worker-program/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 22:55:43 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/idaho-state-to-receive-3-million-grant-to-establish-collaborative-community-health-worker-program/ POCATELLO, Idaho (KIFI) – Idaho State University is set to receive nearly $3 million over several years to establish a collaborative community health worker program for the state, designed to grow the workforce of community and public health. The State of Idaho is one of four beneficiaries in the Northwest and the only beneficiary in […]]]>

POCATELLO, Idaho (KIFI) – Idaho State University is set to receive nearly $3 million over several years to establish a collaborative community health worker program for the state, designed to grow the workforce of community and public health.

The State of Idaho is one of four beneficiaries in the Northwest and the only beneficiary in Idaho. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded 83 recipients nationwide a total of $225.5 million through the Health Resources and Services Administration to fund the Community Health Worker Training Program .

The Community Health Worker Training Program is a new, multi-year program that sponsors training and apprenticeships to support approximately 13,000 community health workers nationwide, including 400 community health workers in Idaho through the UIS Community Health Worker Training Academy. Community health workers connect people to care, build trust within communities, and facilitate communication between patients and health care providers. They may also be known as promotores de salud, community health counselors, outreach workers, patient navigators, and peer counselors.

“Community health programs are essential to raising public health awareness in the state and improving the quality of care in many underserved communities in Idaho,” said U.S. Senator Mike Crapo.

Idaho State University is a leader in providing unique education and training to expand community health work in Idaho.

Ryan Lindsay, chair and associate professor in the Department of Community and Public Health at Idaho State University, said communities in Idaho depend on community health workers for health information and to connect individuals to community resources.

Lindsay works closely with a team to run the Idaho Community Health Worker Training Program and is partnered with Michael Mikitish, Chair and Assistant Professor in the Department of Emergency Services at ISU Meridian Institute of Emergency Management to oversee the project. Lindsay and Mikitish argue that community health workers play an important role as a bridge between traditionally underserved populations and needed health information; support and care; as well as basic and social services.

“Community health workers often help prevent disease and solve the following problems: chronic disease management, maternal and child health, HIV/AIDS, diabetes, substance abuse, asthma and navigating our health system when they have limited resources,” Mikitish said.

This investment from HRSA will help the State of Idaho fund education programs that will ensure community and public health workers have the skills to provide effective community outreach, increase access to care, and assist with services. essential for prevention and treatment.

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Program designed to help improve community health comes to Wilmington https://nefloridacounts.org/program-designed-to-help-improve-community-health-comes-to-wilmington/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 00:31:00 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/program-designed-to-help-improve-community-health-comes-to-wilmington/ Amerihealth Caritas and the Police Athletic League partnered with the Healthy Hoops program on Monday to help improve community health. About 200 elementary and middle school students attended the event held at PAL. Healthy Hoops is a program that strives to engage local children, using basketball, to help teach them and their families how to […]]]>

Amerihealth Caritas and the Police Athletic League partnered with the Healthy Hoops program on Monday to help improve community health.

About 200 elementary and middle school students attended the event held at PAL. Healthy Hoops is a program that strives to engage local children, using basketball, to help teach them and their families how to lead healthy lifestyles while managing asthma .

Asthma is a disease that disproportionately affects people of color nationwide. They have the highest rates of the disease, as well as the highest rates of death and hospitalizations. And this trend does not exclude Delaware.

Amerihealth Caritas Delaware also used the event to provide health education and resources. Market President Emmilyn Lawson said addressing the social determinants of health in underserved communities across the state will help eliminate some inequities.

“Anything we can do to help level the playing field is what we are committed to doing – that’s a big part of our mission. And so that’s where it’s important for us to come and offer healthy snacks It is important to us to encourage healthy activities It is important to us to provide coats to members and individuals in the community who otherwise may not be able to afford them Lawson explained.

Quinn Kirkpatrick

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Delaware Public Media

The Wilmington Police Athletic League hosted the event. Located in the highly concentrated 19802 area code, the PAL provides after-school programming that promotes education, safety and well-being.

Lt. Governor Bethany Hall-Long says PAL deserves credit for putting the needs of children and families in the community first and for using strategic partnerships with health organizations to do so.

“Really recognizing that kids can benefit from learning physical activity through the basketball clinics that are offered here – and in doing so, they are also talking about the behaviors they can adopt at home,” said Hall-Long.

She adds that these behaviors include staying away from unhealthy habits like smoking and improving their diet.

In addition to providing resources to the community, Amerihealth also donated $3,000 to the Police Athletic League to support its work.

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Covington Hospital Launches New Strategies to Improve Community Health https://nefloridacounts.org/covington-hospital-launches-new-strategies-to-improve-community-health/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 12:21:14 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/covington-hospital-launches-new-strategies-to-improve-community-health/ COVINGTONGeorgia. – Hospitals in Piedmont have completed their respective Community Health Needs Assessments (CHNA), which are part of a regulatory responsibility within the framework of a not-for-profit health system, and on November 15 began the implementation implement new strategies to improve the overall health of the communities they serve. The Piedmont Community Benefit team conducted […]]]>

COVINGTONGeorgia. – Hospitals in Piedmont have completed their respective Community Health Needs Assessments (CHNA), which are part of a regulatory responsibility within the framework of a not-for-profit health system, and on November 15 began the implementation implement new strategies to improve the overall health of the communities they serve.

The Piedmont Community Benefit team conducted interviews across Georgia with more than 200 stakeholders, who provided insight into the particular health needs in their respective communities.

“Piedmont exists to serve its communities and the community health needs assessment helps us see where our resources can make a positive difference in the lives of community members who need them most,” said Vice President of External Affairs of Piedmont, Thomas Worthy. .

“Piedmont empowers Georgians by helping them reach their full potential and by better meeting the needs of our communities, we help Georgian citizens live healthier and more fulfilled lives.”

Among the priorities that local councils in Piedmont have ratified as priorities are:

Ensure affordable access to health, mental and dental care. “We will work to ensure that all members of the community have access to affordable health, mental and dental care, regardless of income. This includes partnerships with community organizations, as well as internal programs to increase access to services.

Reduce preventable cases of cancer and cancer deaths. “We will promote both the prevention and treatment of all cancers, and in particular among those most vulnerable to the disease. This includes community screenings and promoting programs to support community members with cancer and their families.

Promote healthy behaviors to reduce preventable chronic conditions and diseases. “We will actively promote healthy behaviors and encourage community members to stop risky behaviors, such as smoking, as well as make efforts to fight obesity. This includes education and widespread health programs.

Reduce preventable cases and deaths from heart disease. “We will promote both prevention and treatment of heart disease and emphasize early detection and healthy behaviors to help reduce risk. We will pay particular attention to populations most at risk for heart disease. »

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Cape Cod Community Health Center Recognized for 2022 Improvements https://nefloridacounts.org/cape-cod-community-health-center-recognized-for-2022-improvements/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 20:33:26 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/cape-cod-community-health-center-recognized-for-2022-improvements/ 17/11/2022 MASHPEE, MA – The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) has awarded the community health center several commendations for outstanding quality improvement. Most notably, the Community Health Center received Silver certification as a Health Center Quality Leader based on the quality measures it implements for the patients it serves. In addition to this award, […]]]>

17/11/2022

MASHPEE, MA – The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) has awarded the community health center several commendations for outstanding quality improvement.

Most notably, the Community Health Center received Silver certification as a Health Center Quality Leader based on the quality measures it implements for the patients it serves. In addition to this award, the Community Health Center has received a number of other accolades, including the following.

Access Enhancer, recognizing CHCs that have increased the total number of patients and the number of patients receiving at least full service by at least 5% in consecutive years.

Advancing HIT for Quality, recognizing CHCs that meet all criteria to optimize health information technology (HIT) services. Address social risk factors, recognize CHCs that screen for social risk factors impacting patient health, and increase access to enabling services. Health Disparities Reducer, recognizing CHCs that qualify for the Access Enhancer award and meet clinical measures related to low birth weight, hypertension control, and uncontrolled diabetes. Patient-Centered Medical Home Recognition (PCMH), recognizing HCCs with PCMH recognition in one or more delivery sites.

“Community Health Center staff have continually worked together to mitigate lapses in maintaining the health of our patients,” said Dr. Kristy Brown, Associate Medical Director for Quality Improvement at CHC.

“We are focusing on what can be done beyond their visits to ensure they are engaged in their own well-being. With new programs such as remote patient monitoring and lifestyle medicine, we are able to take a more holistic approach to caring for our community. »

These awards recognize the best performing health centers in the country as well as health centers that have made significant gains in quality improvement over the previous year.

To learn more about the Community Health Center, call (508) 477-7090 or visit www.CHCofCapeCod.org.

Community Health Center is a federally licensed, not-for-profit health center that provides access to health care for adults and children with MassHealth, Commonwealth Care, Medicare, private insurance, or no insurance. Services include primary and preventative care, dental care, behavioral health, pharmacy and coordinated case management in Bourne, Centerville, Falmouth, Sandwich and Mashpee. Visit the online health center at www.chcofcapecod.org


This press release was produced by Falmouth Chamber of Commerce. The opinions expressed here are those of the author.

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How M2s can help bring change to community health https://nefloridacounts.org/how-m2s-can-help-bring-change-to-community-health/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/how-m2s-can-help-bring-change-to-community-health/ There’s a timeless rule in real estate: Location, location, location. It is perhaps unsurprising that public health has an analogue: the community, the community, the community, which emphasizes a certain medical training. Here are highlights from “Community Health in Action: The AT Still University’s School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona,” Chapter 10 of Value Added […]]]>

There’s a timeless rule in real estate: Location, location, location. It is perhaps unsurprising that public health has an analogue: the community, the community, the community, which emphasizes a certain medical training.

Here are highlights from “Community Health in Action: The AT Still University’s School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona,” Chapter 10 of Value Added Roles for Medical Students, which explores real-world examples of successful student-led, community-based primary care projects.

Value Added Roles for Medical Students is part of the AMA MedEd Innovation series, which provides practical guidance for the local implementation of educational innovations tested and refined by the AMA Accelerating Change in Medical Education Consortium. In addition to presenting case studies, the manual presents the historical context and conceptual underpinnings that underlie the roles of medical students that add value to the health care system as well as to their education.

When AT Still University (ATSU) established its School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona (SOMA), in 2007, it entered into a partnership with the National Association of Community Health Centers through which students are onboarded on time full in community health centers for the second, third and fourth year of their undergraduate medical training. In 2020, ATSU-SOMA had 15 partner sites in 11 states.

“By working and living in these environments, ATSU-SOMA students develop an authentic perspective regarding the challenges patients face when trying to access care,” wrote the authors, Joy H. Lewis, DO, PhD, Professor of Medicine and Public Health, and Kate Whelihan, MPH, Public Health Instructor at ATSU-SOMA. The challenges can be financial, linguistic, cultural, geographical or related to mobility.

“Thus, they learn to actively contribute to improving health outcomes for vulnerable individuals and populations,” they wrote.

Learn more with the AMA at how value-added roles can transform medical education.

Related coverage

Why asking questions about the social determinants of health is so important

To better understand population health, all second-year students at ATSU-SOMA participate in a one-year sequence of courses in epidemiology, biostatistics and preventive medicine.

At the same time, they work with health center leaders, community members and other stakeholders to develop, implement and evaluate primary care projects that address the social determinants of health.

Community-based primary care projects represent “an ideal structure for medical students,” the authors wrote, noting that students use their early medical knowledge and various life skills to provide services and programs that meet the local needs.

Community-based primary care projects “serve as experiential learning opportunities,” they added. “These allow students to learn about community health, research methods, program development and evaluation.

Students work in groups and learn to follow all the steps required of any investigator, including conducting needs assessments, conducting literature reviews, developing detailed project proposals, and submitting their projects for review. by human subjects.

Find out how M1 and M2 are help patients navigate complex medical systems.

Related coverage

Don’t Leave Health Equity to Chance: Future Advocates Get a Boost

Projects addressed unwanted pregnancies, negative childhood experiences, poor attachment to community resources, and the physical and mental well-being of refugees.

“The vast majority of students rate their experiences with the projects as favorable,” the authors wrote. “Students have always expressed that they understand the value of the community project as a learning experience and as a way to give back to their CSC community. »

The chapter includes a partner site readiness assessment checklist and a summary of the toolkit used by students and faculty to implement the projects, as well as key guidance for feasibility and durability.

Value Added Roles for Medical Students features case studies of additional longitudinal experiences, as well as tips for planning, launching, sustaining and growing value-added roles.

Additionally, in 2020 WADA published the second edition of the Health Systems Science textbook. Companion, Scientific Review of Health Systemsprovides case-based questions followed by discussion of the answers and suggested readings.

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How Community Health Services Help Prevent Homelessness and Hunger – Michigan Medicine Headlines https://nefloridacounts.org/how-community-health-services-help-prevent-homelessness-and-hunger-michigan-medicine-headlines/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 16:19:08 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/how-community-health-services-help-prevent-homelessness-and-hunger-michigan-medicine-headlines/ About 4 minutes to read Key points to remember: It’s National Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week. The Bureau of Housing for the Aged, Ann Arbor Meals on Wheels, and the Regional Alliance for Healthy Schools are all part of Michigan Medicine’s Community Health Services – and they support everyone dealing with homelessness and hunger. The […]]]>

About 4 minutes to read

Key points to remember:

  • It’s National Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week.
  • The Bureau of Housing for the Aged, Ann Arbor Meals on Wheels, and the Regional Alliance for Healthy Schools are all part of Michigan Medicine’s Community Health Services – and they support everyone dealing with homelessness and hunger.
  • The programs help Michigan Medicine provide health care outside of hospitals and health centers, “in the places where people live, work, play and pray.”

This week is National Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week, an opportunity to educate the public and bring attention to the causes and challenges facing those who suffer from hunger and homelessness. roaming.

In Michigan Medicine, the Housing Bureau for Seniors and several other programs provide services that prevent homelessness and address hunger. These programs are part of Community Health Services, the main initiatives of which are designed to improve the health of our communities, including caring for and promoting the health of children and families and protecting the health and quality life of the elderly.

Three CHS programs directly address homelessness and hunger: the aforementioned Housing Office for Seniors, Ann Arbor Meals on Wheels, and the Regional Alliance for Healthy Schools.

Here’s what you might not know about these important agencies:

Senior Housing Office

The Office of Housing for the Elderly (HBS) social work team helps tenants and landlords secure sustainable housing through the provision of free housing counseling and case management services.

By helping seniors (55+) obtain or maintain sustainable housing, HBS also supports their ability to obtain healthy, nutritious food, pay for necessary medications, and maintain independence.

“Sustainable housing for seniors ultimately translates to better mental health, fewer hospital visits and peace of mind,” said Janet Hunko, director of the Office of Senior Housing. “Older adults face many unique challenges as they age; housing should never be one of them.

Of Washtenaw County’s 30,000 senior households, nearly 10,000 are “housing-cost burdened,” meaning they spend more than a third of their income on housing-related expenses, prevents them from affording medicine and food.

“It is critical that seniors retain their homes in Washtenaw County as there is a severe shortage of affordable housing available,” Hunko said. “We only have about 1.6 affordable housing units for every 10 households burdened with housing costs. And that problem is exacerbated by the fact that nearly 20% of homeless adults in Washtenaw County are 55 and older and need the same affordable housing.

Ann Arbor Meals on Wheels

Ann Arbor Meals on Wheels (AAMOW) seeks to reduce hunger and food insecurity in a culturally appropriate way for housebound people in the Ann Arbor area who are unable to shop and to prepare complete and nutritious meals themselves.

In FY22, AAMOW provided 128,835 Western, Asian, vegetarian, gluten-free and liquid meals to 418 customers, including 154 new customers, with the loyal support of 250 volunteers who donated 6,860 hours of their time.

When AAMOW customers were asked about the impact AAMOW has had on their lives, 86% agreed that meals on wheels were their primary source of nutrition. Meanwhile, 98% of customers agreed that Meals on Wheels helped them stay home and live independently, 95% said they ate healthier thanks to AAMOW, and 95% indicated that AAMOW helped them maintain or achieve a healthy weight.

Regional Alliance for a Healthy School

The Regional Alliance of Healthy Schools (RAHS) operates several School Health Centers, which provide a unique setting for Registered Dietitians Nutritionists (RDNs) to provide preventative nutrition services to adolescents who may not have access due to transportation. , financial barriers and other factors.

This access allows RDNs to perform food insecurity screening and ongoing patient follow-up. Individual nutritional counseling is also provided and can be extended to a group setting with physical activity and the use of evidence-based curricula.

“Monitoring progress, connecting with families and building relationships with community partners for resources are imperative to community success,” said Allison Shannon, MPH, RDN Chief Clinical Dietitian for RAHS..

RAHS partners with Food Gatherers for food distribution and the Washtenaw County Health Department Ordinance for health program to provide families with a scenario for purchasing fresh fruits and vegetables from regional farmers markets and school welfare teams to consult on an ongoing basis to address concerns identified by school districts.

A strong support network

In total, CHS is made up of nine different departments that have a strong base of community support, all of which positively impact the health and well-being of the community.

“These programs represent Michigan Medicine’s commitment to the community – health care does not just happen within the four walls of the hospital, but in the places where people live, work, play and pray” , said Alfreda Rooks, director of CHS. “We are proud of the work we do to build bridges and connect communities to programs and services that promote improved health and quality of life.

Watch the video at the top of the page for insights from those who have lived with housing instability in Washtenaw County.

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Understanding the California Community Health Worker/Promoter Workforce: A Survey of CHWs/HPs https://nefloridacounts.org/understanding-the-california-community-health-worker-promoter-workforce-a-survey-of-chws-hps/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 03:33:45 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/understanding-the-california-community-health-worker-promoter-workforce-a-survey-of-chws-hps/ In California, one of the most culturally diverse states in the country, health care must bridge cultural and linguistic divides to serve all communities equitably. As trusted community members with lived experience, community health workers and promoters (ASC/P) have a long history of connecting people underserved by the traditional health care system with culturally competent […]]]>

In California, one of the most culturally diverse states in the country, health care must bridge cultural and linguistic divides to serve all communities equitably. As trusted community members with lived experience, community health workers and promoters (ASC/P) have a long history of connecting people underserved by the traditional health care system with culturally competent health and social services.

In California, CHW/Ps are increasingly recognized as an essential part of the healthcare workforce. In 2019, the California Future Health Workforce Commission recommended increasing the CHW/P workforce to expand access to preventive and social support services as well as team-integrated primary and behavioral health care.

It is important that CHWs/SPs themselves share their experiences and express their opinions about their profession. ASC/Ps across the state and in various workplaces were asked to complete a survey between October 2021 and January 2022. This report summarizes the results and attempts to crystallize ASC/P attributes and perspectives. Given this moment, the survey brings up data regarding the work of CHWs/Ps during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Main conclusions

The vast majority of respondents were employed full-time in a paid CHW/P position. Among these respondents, key findings included:

  • The majority of respondents were women and Latinos/x.
  • The majority of respondents worked in the Bay Area.
  • Almost two-thirds of respondents’ employers required a high school diploma or less.
  • More than half of the respondents worked in a community organization and a plurality worked in a community clinic or a community health centre.
  • Almost half of the respondents were paid between $20 and $25 an hour.
  • Most respondents had completed relatively short ASC/P training (40 hours or less). Nearly 70% of survey respondents had received ASC/P training. For most of these respondents, the training was required and paid for by their employer.
  • The type of work respondents most often reported doing included identifying and referring people to community resources, as well as case management, coordination and navigation.
  • The work of a plurality of respondents did not focus on specific health conditions. Among respondents whose work focused on specific health conditions, chronic conditions and complex health or social needs were most commonly reported.
  • The work of a plurality of respondents was not intended to serve specific populations or groups of people.
  • Respondents were divided on whether they saw potential for advancement in their role as CHW/P. While most respondents saw an opportunity for advancement in their role, 49% said there was no opportunity or they were unsure of their advancement opportunities.
  • Documentation of services (i.e. documentation of services provided to clients in an electronic health record [EHR], paper medical record, or a separate record-keeping system) was an important component of the CHW/P’s role. Nearly a third of respondents spent 10 hours a week or more on documentation in an EHR.
  • The COVID-19 pandemic has increased the amount of CHW/P work conducted virtually. In the wake of COVID-19, most respondents anticipated that computer skills, general knowledge about COVID-19, and resilience would be the most important attributes to possess over the next three to nine months.

The authors note that the results are not representative of the entire CHW/P population in California. Furthermore, the survey could only be completed in English or Spanish.

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Elon University / Today in Elon / November 16 Community Health Update https://nefloridacounts.org/elon-university-today-in-elon-november-16-community-health-update/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 19:56:30 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/elon-university-today-in-elon-november-16-community-health-update/ A weekly update from Vice President for Student Life Jon Dooley with community health information, important resources, and announcements of any protocol changes. Dear students, teachers and staff, Thanksgiving break comes at an important time in the semester, with projects, papers, and exams on the horizon. It can also be a good time to take […]]]>

A weekly update from Vice President for Student Life Jon Dooley with community health information, important resources, and announcements of any protocol changes.

Dear students, teachers and staff,

Thanksgiving break comes at an important time in the semester, with projects, papers, and exams on the horizon. It can also be a good time to take a step back and assess your approach to health and wellness. Visit the university Health EU website for a comprehensive set of resources and recommendations. Tabs on the site allow users to view resources by category (students or faculty/staff) or by the six dimensions of well-being. Students, remember that Virtual Mental Health and Medical Resources from TimelyCare stay available during the break, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, from anywhere in the United States

Additional key health information in this week’s update includes:

  • Last flu and COVID-19 reminder clinic on campus – November 29
  • Asymptomatic testing schedule
  • Safety and services on campus during the Thanksgiving holiday
  • Community health update – no email update next week

Last flu and COVID-19 reminder clinic on campus – November 29

Due to strong interest in on-campus flu and COVID-19 reminder clinics, we have added an additional clinic date on Tuesday, November 29, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., at Lakeside 214. Pre-registration is recommended. This will be the last COVID-19 flu shot/reminder clinic of the quarter.

Whether through an on-campus clinic or at home during the Thanksgiving holiday, students, faculty, and staff are strongly encouraged to keep up to date with the latest COVID-19 reminder and annual vaccine against flu.

Asymptomatic testing schedule

The schedule for asymptomatic testing at McCoy Commons, 212 (Oaks Neighborhood) will be adjusted in the coming week, but remains available for those who wish to test before traveling or visiting family.

  • Program for the rest of this week:
    • Wednesday, November 16 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. and from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
    • Thursday, November 17 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. and from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
    • Friday, November 18 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.
  • Next week’s schedule:
    • From Monday, November 21 to Wednesday, November 23, from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. and from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
    • Closed from Thursday 24 November to Sunday 27 November
    • Visit the Campus Health Status and Alerts website for other COVID-19 testing options.

Visit the Campus health and alerts website for other COVID-19 testing options.

Safety and services on campus during the Thanksgiving holiday

The University offices will be closed next Thursday and Friday, November 24 and 25, for the Thanksgiving holiday.

Detailed information was shared with the university community in an email yesterday on security and services on campus during the Thanksgiving holiday.

Community health update – no email update next week

Every Tuesday afternoon at 4 p.m., the university COVID-19 webpage is updated with information on the status of COVID-19 in our community. The site also includes a link to the latest CDC COVID-19 information. community levelswhich are presently at Low in Alamance and Guilford counties.

There will be no weekly Community Health Update email next week. Our next message will be Wednesday, November 30 at 10:45 a.m.

Best wishes for a healthy, safe and relaxing break!

Jon Dooley, Ph.D.

Vice President of Student Life

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