Health resources – NE Florida Counts http://nefloridacounts.org/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 08:27:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://nefloridacounts.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/icon-64-150x150.jpg Health resources – NE Florida Counts http://nefloridacounts.org/ 32 32 Texas Health Resources names five new hospital presidents https://nefloridacounts.org/texas-health-resources-names-five-new-hospital-presidents/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 17:05:30 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/texas-health-resources-names-five-new-hospital-presidents/ Texas Health Resources is promoting five healthcare leaders to replenish its hospital leadership. Texas Health Plano, Southwest, Allen, HEB and Cleburne are installing new leaders to lead their acute care facilities starting July 3. Fraser Hay will lead Texas Health Plano, where he served as vice president of professional and support services from 2015 to […]]]>

Texas Health Resources is promoting five healthcare leaders to replenish its hospital leadership. Texas Health Plano, Southwest, Allen, HEB and Cleburne are installing new leaders to lead their acute care facilities starting July 3.

Fraser Hay will lead Texas Health Plano, where he served as vice president of professional and support services from 2015 to 2017 before becoming president of Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Hurst-Euless-Bedford. While at HEB, Hay focused her attention on inclusion and empathy while starting a neurosurgery program at the hospital. He has also worked with the local school district to prepare students for careers in healthcare.

Ajith Pai will assume the role of Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Southwest Fort Worth after serving as president of Texas Health Cleburne for four years. He focused on recruiting physicians and worked with the Texas Health Physician Group to bring new primary care and general surgery practices to Cleburne. In February, the hospital launched its dialysis service and earned a spot on Washington Monthly’s 2020 list of America’s Top 20 Hospitals.

On the north side of the region, Amanda Thrash will serve as president of Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Allen. Thrash served as Vice President of Professional and Support Services at Texas Health Plano and began her career at Texas Health as an administrative resident in 2009 at the system’s flagship hospital in Dallas before moving to Plano in 2010. She has also served for two years as a director. of Texas Health Neighborhood Care and Wellness Prosper in 2016. While in Plano, she enhanced the EMS outreach strategy and oversaw the growth of Cardiovascular Surgery and Robotic Surgery services.

After serving as president of Texas Health Allen since 2016, Jared Shelton will serve as president of Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Hurst-Euless-Bedford. Prior to that, he spent six years at Texas Health Dallas in various administrative leadership roles. While at Allen, the hospital achieved the highest scores in the system for physician engagement and patient safety culture while executing a campus master plan that included a 68-hour hospital expansion. million that opened in June 2020. The addition included the Texas Health Athlete Complex, a third medical office building with an outpatient spine surgery center and new primary care offices.

Additionally, Christopher Leu will serve as President of Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Cleburne after serving as President of Texas Health Stephenville for 15 years. He began his career there on the finance team in 1993 and moved to Texas Health Arlington Memorial Hospital in 1998. Leu led a multi-million dollar project to build a larger emergency department, which opened in 2015, and has helped recruit new physicians to the community. while adding hyperbaric oxygen therapy and cardiac rehabilitation services.

“We are thrilled to promote five seasoned and talented hospital leaders,” Kirk King, chief operating officer of Texas Health’s Hospital Channel, said in a statement. “They have made valuable contributions to the success of Texas Health for many years and will continue our mission to provide safe and reliable care to the communities we serve.”

Author

Will is the editor of CEO magazine and editor of D CEO Healthcare. He wrote about health care…

]]>
A Guide to Reproductive Health Resources for the Chapel Hill Community https://nefloridacounts.org/a-guide-to-reproductive-health-resources-for-the-chapel-hill-community/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 00:39:01 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/a-guide-to-reproductive-health-resources-for-the-chapel-hill-community/ The United States Supreme Court struck down Roe v. Wade on Friday in a 5-4 decision. The landmark case – which had been a national precedent for nearly 50 years – established the constitutional right to abortion. The ruling will give each state the power to set its own abortion access laws, and nearly half […]]]>

The United States Supreme Court struck down Roe v. Wade on Friday in a 5-4 decision. The landmark case – which had been a national precedent for nearly 50 years – established the constitutional right to abortion.

The ruling will give each state the power to set its own abortion access laws, and nearly half of U.S. states are expected to ban or severely restrict abortion. The decision is consistent with the court’s decision to uphold an abortion ban in Mississippi in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization.

Abortion is still legal in North Carolina.

Here are some reproductive health resources for UNC students and members of the Chapel Hill community.

South Atlantic Family Planning

Planned Parenthood provides affordable abortion, birth control, emergency contraception, sexually transmitted infection care, pregnancy testing and counseling, and other sexual and reproductive health services.

There are nine Planned Parenthood clinics in North Carolina, including one in Chapel Hill. You can visit during walk-in hours, book an appointment in person or via telehealth on its website or call (800) 230-7526.

The choice of a woman

A Woman’s Choice provides confidential abortion care at home or in clinic for up to 19.6 weeks. The clinic also offers personal ultrasound appointments, emergency contraception, pregnancy testing, birth control options, STI and HIV testing, and other reproductive health services.

A Woman’s Choice has locations in Raleigh, Greensboro and Charlotte. Call (800) 298-8874.

Carolina Abortion Fund

The Carolina Abortion Fund supports individuals with the financial and logistical aspects of an abortion. The fund operates a secure and confidential telephone line: (855) 518-4603.

The phone line is only open on Mondays and the fund will return calls within 48 hours. Appellants will need to have an appointment to receive funding.

The National Network of Abortion Funds can also help individuals find funds for abortion in their area. Abortion funds provide funding, travel, housing, and other forms of financial support to people in need.

Abortion search

Abortion Finder is a directory that connects people in need of an abortion to over 700 verified health centers across the country. Individuals can search by address to find the pills, services, and procedures that work best for them.

Orange County Department of Health

OCHD provides family planning services at its clinics in Chapel Hill and Hillsborough. Services are confidential and by appointment. Medical clinics offer free pregnancy tests, as well as advice on methods of contraception and prevention of STIs. Individuals have access to birth control methods or prescriptions, including intrauterine devices (IUDs), Nexaplon, and birth control pills.

Gynecology at UNC Campus Health

The Gynecology Clinic at UNC Campus Health offers birth control services, IUD and Nexplanon placement and removal, pregnancy testing, counseling, and more by appointment.

Book an appointment online or call (919) 966-2281.

Student Health Action Coalition

SHAC is the oldest free, student-run clinic in the country. The coalition provides free health care and services to uninsured and underinsured community members in Carrboro, Chapel Hill and Durham – including birth control, gynecological care, sexual health counseling and HIV/STI testing.

The coalition also has interpretation services for Spanish and Mandarin-speaking patients.

If your organization provides reproductive care or access to safe abortion in the Chapel Hill area, please email manager.editor@dailytarheel.com for information added to this article.

@alliemkelly

university@dailytarheel.com | city@dailytarheel.com

To get the day’s news and headlines delivered to your inbox every morning, sign up for our email newsletters.

]]>
Anthem provides behavioral health resources: Learn2Live, LiveHealth Online Psychology, Psychiatry https://nefloridacounts.org/anthem-provides-behavioral-health-resources-learn2live-livehealth-online-psychology-psychiatry/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 12:35:28 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/anthem-provides-behavioral-health-resources-learn2live-livehealth-online-psychology-psychiatry/ Courtesy of Anthem, Purdue’s medical plan administrator, benefits-eligible faculty and staff, and dependents covered by a Purdue health plan have access to certain behavioral health resources. They are: LiveHealth Psychology Online LiveHealth Psychiatry Online Learn2Live These three resources support the behavioral health pillar of the Healthy Boiler program. LiveHealth Online Psychology and LiveHealth Online Psychiatry […]]]>

Courtesy of Anthem, Purdue’s medical plan administrator, benefits-eligible faculty and staff, and dependents covered by a Purdue health plan have access to certain behavioral health resources. They are:

  • LiveHealth Psychology Online
  • LiveHealth Psychiatry Online
  • Learn2Live

These three resources support the behavioral health pillar of the Healthy Boiler program.

LiveHealth Online Psychology and LiveHealth Online Psychiatry provide online access to psychologists and medication management support for common behavioral disorders such as major depressive disorder, anxiety, and bipolar disorder.

LiveHealth’s online psychology and psychiatry services have been well received by the Purdue community, and engagement continues to grow. Since 2019, Purdue has seen a 250% increase in usage (from 193 visits in 2019 to 496 visits in 2021) of behavioral health services with LiveHealth Online. In addition, the satisfaction rating – 4.7/5 on average – of the services rendered was maintained throughout.

Learn2Live, formerly known as myStrength, is another element of Anthem’s behavioral health services. Learn2Live offers a variety of digital behavioral health services based on the principles of cognitive behavioral therapy. Via Learn2Live, accessible through the Anthem portal, employees covered by a Purdue health plan have access to:

  • Personalized and individual coaching.
  • A support team of family and friends built by each individual.
  • Mindfulness tools on the go.
  • Live and on-demand webinars.

Available anytime, anywhere, Learn2Live tools can help individuals identify thoughts and behaviors that affect emotional well-being – and overcome them. Through Learn2Live, individuals can learn effective ways to manage stress, depression, anxiety, substance use, and sleep issues.

To access Learn2Live, sign in to anthem.com, navigate to My Health Dashboard, choose Programs, and select Emotional Well-being Resources.

ADDITIONAL MENTAL HEALTH RESOURCES

To help teachers and staff

Visit the Mental Health Resources webpage for a variety of resources available to faculty and staff, including resources for all Purdue campuses, information about Purdue Health Plan coverage for mental health and substance abuse, and behavioral health referral locations for West Lafayette, Fort Wayne, and Northwestern Campus.

To help students

Faculty and staff who work with students or have a student at home can direct students to the resources below for behavioral health assistance. Note: LiveHealth Online Psychology and LiveHealth Online Psychiatry services are also available to Purdue students covered by a Purdue health plan. Mental health visits through LiveHealth Online are 100% covered under the Purdue student health plan.

Office of the Dean of Students

Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS)

Questions

Questions can be directed to Human Resources at 765-494-2222, toll free at 877-725-0222 or by email at hr@purdue.edu or HRHelp (secure email).

]]>
Wellington.Scoop » Better health resources needed for Pacific community in eastern Porirua https://nefloridacounts.org/wellington-scoop-better-health-resources-needed-for-pacific-community-in-eastern-porirua/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 00:01:01 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/wellington-scoop-better-health-resources-needed-for-pacific-community-in-eastern-porirua/ Pacific Health Plus News“The establishment of a new health system and the appointment of interim Maori and Pacific Chief Executive Officers have brought the promise of a more equitable and responsive health system closer to reality,” says Fiso John Fiso, President of Pacific Health Plus, a primary healthcare provider in Eastern Porirua. “It has brought […]]]>

Pacific Health Plus News
“The establishment of a new health system and the appointment of interim Maori and Pacific Chief Executive Officers have brought the promise of a more equitable and responsive health system closer to reality,” says Fiso John Fiso, President of Pacific Health Plus, a primary healthcare provider in Eastern Porirua. “It has brought a lot of optimism to Maori and Pacific communities.”

“But time is running out as we look forward to seeing the successful execution of the ‘do better’ plan and the establishment of a health system that ‘recognizes the diversity of needs and ensures equity of outcomes’ .

“Appointments have been made, including a director of Pacific Health at the third level of the executive; the new health strategy is approved, which recognizes that the needs of the Pacific are not well met; and now – we urgently need action on the ground.

“Because from where I stand, change is needed quickly to alter the daily realities of the Pacific people in Cannons Creek, East Porirua.

“The Pacific Community in Porirua is the largest in New Zealand, outside of South Auckland, and it has made many promises over the years with very little to deliver. 21% of the population identifies with the Pacific, 49% live in the very disadvantaged area of ​​eastern Porirua.

“Not only does this group have the worst health outcomes, they are the only population group whose statistics have deteriorated, despite promises, nominations, strategies and investments.

“Adult mortality rates are 74% higher than average; the life expectancy of babies is the lowest of any group in the Wellington region. Cardiovascular emergency admission rates are the highest and diabetes is three times more common.

“What COVID has confirmed to us is that the Pacific Community is most vulnerable to health outbreaks and continues to be overrepresented in hospital deaths.

“Health reforms indicate that this will change for communities in the Pacific. But we must ensure that these changes are timely, appropriately resourced, and implemented by Pacific-for-Pacific.

“We have to see the measures improve. We need to see the 10-year trend of deteriorating health for Pacific people in Porirua come to a head. We need less diabetes and heart disease and longer life expectancy, in line with trends in other population groups.

“The time has come, the public has been galvanized – they recognize the inequality, see the need for change and recognize that our Pacific New Zealanders have the same right as all other New Zealanders to lead healthy lives. and well filled.

“So I call on those responsible for the success of this massive reform, bring the change you promised, and bring it quickly, before more lives are lost,” Fiso said.

]]>
California College IDs May Soon Include Mental Health Resources | New https://nefloridacounts.org/california-college-ids-may-soon-include-mental-health-resources-new/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 19:11:41 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/california-college-ids-may-soon-include-mental-health-resources-new/ By Carolyn Jones EdSource Three years after California required colleges to put suicide prevention phone numbers on all student ID cards, a group of students wants to take the push for student welfare one step further: by adding a 24-hour mental health hotline. Assembly Bill 2122, introduced last month, would require all community colleges and […]]]>

By Carolyn Jones

EdSource

Three years after California required colleges to put suicide prevention phone numbers on all student ID cards, a group of students wants to take the push for student welfare one step further: by adding a 24-hour mental health hotline.

Assembly Bill 2122, introduced last month, would require all community colleges and California State University campuses to print a phone number on student ID cards for local mental health services, either through the city, county or college itself. The hotline would be optional for the University of California because the legislature does not have authority over UC.

Most campuses already have mental health centers, but not all have 24-hour crisis numbers. The bill encourages those without mental health centers to establish one and urges all campuses to establish mental health helplines.

“Mental health is often overlooked until it’s too late – students start to suffer from extreme burnout, disengagement, falling grades. There are so many things schools can do to help students before they reach that point,” said Leo Corzo-Clark, a recent graduate of Albany High School in the East Bay who helped draft the bill with his colleagues at Generation Up, a California student advocacy group. . Assemblyman Steven Choi, R-Irvine, sponsored the bill.

The Assembly’s Higher Education Committee is due to hear the bill on Tuesday. It follows two other student welfare bills – SB 972, which requires high schools and colleges to print a suicide hotline on ID cards, and SB 316, which places domestic violence hotlines on student ID cards – which have been adopted in recent years, along with a slew of legislation relating to student mental health in general.

California State University, which does not oppose the bill, has significantly expanded its student mental health services since the pandemic began two years ago. Each of its 23 campuses offers in-person and online student counseling services, and a $15 million state grant allows each campus to hire more counselors and other staff to respond to growing needs.

Student mental health was declining long before the pandemic, due to economic uncertainty, social injustice, an increase in communal violence, climate change and other issues, but accelerated when Covid forced the closure of school campuses and increased social isolation. A recent report from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that more than 44% of high school students had experienced lingering feelings of sadness or hopelessness in the past year, and 9% had attempted suicide. Among college students and young adults, more than 60% reported experiencing severe anxiety and depression during the pandemic, according to Boston College researchers, whose work has been published in the journal Translational Behavioral Medicine.

Kimberly Woo, a junior at UC Berkeley who helped write AB 2122, said she was so depressed in her freshman year that she often couldn’t get out of bed. She felt social anxiety about meeting new people and was overwhelmed by the stress of school and being away from home. She says she tried to contact the campus mental health center, but staff never called her back. Her frustration drove her to get involved with AB 2122.

“My experience was not unique. Many students suffer from mental health issues and there are too few therapists,” she said. “I want to make sure that mental health resources are so accessible that they literally end up in students’ back pockets.

Assemblyman Choi, vice chair of the Assembly’s higher education committee and a former member of the Irvine Unified School Board, said student mental health is among his top priorities.

“What we already knew has only been highlighted by the pandemic over the past two years: young people too often suffer from mental health issues and may not seek help even when resources are available,” said Choi. “I know my bill would be an important step in ensuring our students get the health care services they may need.

AB 2122 is one of many bills related to K-12 schools and higher education that Generation Up students have helped draft this year. AB 2683, the only other bill affecting colleges, would require colleges to educate students about preventing sexual harassment and violence.

Three bills affect K-12 schools: SB 955 would require schools to excuse students for absences related to political or civic engagement, such as attending a protest, voting, or volunteering as a poll worker. SB 997 would strengthen student representation on steering committees. SB 1236 would give full voting rights to student members of school boards.

Alvin Lee, one of the founders of Generation Up, said his group came up with these ideas after surveying thousands of college students across California about their needs and priorities. Mental health and political empowerment were the main concerns, he said. He and his colleagues went with these particular ideas because they could benefit many students, cost very little, and aren’t particularly controversial.

“We see them as simple, direct ways to make a big impact,” said Lee, a student at Claremont McKenna College. “Mental health is especially important because it is the foundation of a student’s well-being. They cannot concentrate and thrive in a learning environment unless they feel mentally well.

Corzo-Clark, who is now a freshman at Brown University in Rhode Island, said he decided to champion AB 2122 after hearing so many students talk about their struggles finding mental health counseling, even as life became increasingly stressful during the pandemic. He also heard students say they were sometimes hesitant to seek help because of the stigma associated with mental health disorders.

“I would like to see this bill enacted. But just introducing the bill is a way to start a conversation and let the Legislature know that this is a priority for students,” Corzo-Clark said. “Students say, ‘This is what we need.’ ”

]]>
Ensure all children in Uvalde have access to behavioral health resources https://nefloridacounts.org/ensure-all-children-in-uvalde-have-access-to-behavioral-health-resources/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 21:09:22 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/ensure-all-children-in-uvalde-have-access-to-behavioral-health-resources/ Governor Greg Abbott sent a letter directing Cecile Young, Commissioner of the Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC), to use all available resources to ensure that mental health support services are available for every child in the community of Uvalde following the tragedy at Robb Elementary School. Image for illustrative purposes – Advertising – […]]]>
Governor Greg Abbott sent a letter directing Cecile Young, Commissioner of the Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC), to use all available resources to ensure that mental health support services are available for every child in the community of Uvalde following the tragedy at Robb Elementary School. Image for illustrative purposes
– Advertising –

Texas Border Affairs

Governor Greg Abbott

Governor Greg Abbott sent a letter directing Cecile Young, Commissioner of the Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC), to use all available resources to ensure that mental health support services are available for every child in the community of Uvalde following the tragedy at Robb Elementary School. The governor also directed HHSC to work alongside the Texas Education Agency (TEA) and the Texas Child Mental Health Care Consortium to provide behavioral health resources and community support that are critical to Uvalde’s recovery.

“As these families begin to rebuild their lives, it is essential that the children of Uvalde have access to mental health treatment,” reads the letter. “The Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) has jurisdiction over behavioral health services on behalf of the state. Given this substantial capacity, I ask that you use all available resources to work with families to provide behavioral health services to every child in Uvalde who wants support. While we cannot erase what happened in Uvalde, we can ensure, through the coordinated efforts of HHSC, TEA, and other organizations, that every child in this community receives the support they need.

Read the governor’s letter.

Governor Abbott has taken significant steps to provide all available resources to support the community of Uvalde following the tragic shooting at Robb Elementary School. These actions include:

  • Launch of comprehensive plan for the state of Texas to help and support members of the community, including co-location of state agency representatives to the Family Assistance Center for immediate assistance in seeking benefits .
  • Issue a disaster declaration at the request of local leaders to expedite all national and local resources available to assist the community of Uvalde.
  • Ask Texas legislative leaders to convene special legislative committees to begin reviewing and developing legislative recommendations on school safety, mental health, social media, police training, gun safety, and more.
  • Directing the Texas School Safety Center (TxSSC) to immediately begin conducting comprehensive school safety reviews to ensure that all public schools in Texas are following proper procedures to maximize school safety.
  • Lead the Texas Education Agency (TEA) to provide strategies to make Texas public schools safer through enhanced safety standards.
  • Directing ALERRT (Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Response Training) programs to provide training to all school districts in the state, prioritizing school-based law enforcement.
  • Lead DPS, TEA, THECB to expand and expedite the ability to report suspicious activity through the iWatchTexas reporting system.
  • Initial investment of $5 million to establish a long-term Family Resilience Center (FRC) in Uvalde County to serve as a hub for community services, including access to essential mental health resources .
  • Work with the OneStar Foundation to create a one-stop donation webpage to support the families of the victims, teachers and the community of Uvalde.
– Advertising –

]]>
Hudson introduces bill to increase mental health safety and resources in schools https://nefloridacounts.org/hudson-introduces-bill-to-increase-mental-health-safety-and-resources-in-schools/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 18:04:28 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/hudson-introduces-bill-to-increase-mental-health-safety-and-resources-in-schools/ ROCKINGHAM — A congressman who once represented Richmond County — and is aiming again — is proposing to add more resource officers and mental health resources to schools across the country. Republican U.S. Representative Richard Hudson on Tuesday filed the STOP II, Secure Every School and Protect our Nation’s Children Act. The $7 billion proposal […]]]>

ROCKINGHAM — A congressman who once represented Richmond County — and is aiming again — is proposing to add more resource officers and mental health resources to schools across the country.

Republican U.S. Representative Richard Hudson on Tuesday filed the STOP II, Secure Every School and Protect our Nation’s Children Act.

The $7 billion proposal breaks down into providing $1 billion for resource officers and $1 billion for guidance counselors, with the remaining $5 billion “for school hardening, active shooter training, and training law enforcement, school officials and students to intervene in front of a student. reached a breaking point,” according to a press release.

According to Hudson’s office, the funding would come from unused COVID-19 funds.

The legislation comes two weeks after a shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, left 19 students and two teachers dead and 17 injured.

“As the father of a child in elementary school, I want to do everything possible to protect children in schools,” Hudson said in a statement. “Instead of gun control that threatens the Second Amendment rights of law-abiding citizens, this legislation aims to make schools safer, improve mental health and save lives.”

On May 30, Democratic Representative Jerrold Nadler of New York introduced the Protecting Our Children Act which, among other things: would raise the age of gun purchase to 21; requiring all firearms to be traceable; revise storage laws and propose safe storage subsidy programs; and revise the laws regarding “large capacity ammunition feeders”.

This bill is co-sponsored by 177 Democrats and supported by President Joe Biden.

Hudson called the bill “a missed opportunity to make real progress.”

“A lot of people say ‘do something.’ I say let’s do something that matters,” Hudson said. “The STOP II Act will actually prevent school shootings and is one of many solutions proposed by House Republicans to address the issues we face. “

According to Hudson’s office, his bill builds on the STOP School Violence Act passed and signed into law in 2018.

Under his bill, schools could apply for grants under the previous law “to conduct risk assessments and identify gaps in mental health services for students.”

Hudson’s bill also “requires federal agencies to continuously update, expand and provide training materials on bullying and cyberbullying, emergency planning, mental health and targeted violence to help schools to prevent, protect, mitigate, respond to and recover from a range of school security threats, hazards and emergencies.

The text of Hudson’s bill was not available on Congress.gov as of 2 p.m. Tuesday.

So far, 24 other Republicans have co-sponsored the bill, including fellow North Carolina Representatives Greg Murphy of the 3rd District and David Rouser of the 7th District.

Hudson currently represents the 8th congressional district.

The congressman recently won the Republican primary for the redesigned 9th District which now includes Scotland, Hoke, Lee, Chatham and Randolph counties in addition to North West Cumberland, West Harnett and West part of east Richmond. He will face Sen. Ben Clark, D-Hoke, in November.

]]>
Bexar County approves $37 million for gun violence prevention and mental health resources https://nefloridacounts.org/bexar-county-approves-37-million-for-gun-violence-prevention-and-mental-health-resources/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 23:39:44 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/bexar-county-approves-37-million-for-gun-violence-prevention-and-mental-health-resources/ SAN ANTONIO – Bexar County leaders are focused on preventing gun deaths, and they hope more money for resources will help them. On Tuesday, the Bexar County Court of Commissioners voted unanimously to approve approximately $37 million in funding for gun violence prevention and mental health resources from the American Rescue Plan Act, or ARPA. […]]]>

SAN ANTONIO – Bexar County leaders are focused on preventing gun deaths, and they hope more money for resources will help them.

On Tuesday, the Bexar County Court of Commissioners voted unanimously to approve approximately $37 million in funding for gun violence prevention and mental health resources from the American Rescue Plan Act, or ARPA.

“This year, more people in Texas have died from firearms than in any other state,” Bexar County Judge Nelson Wolff said at the county commissioner’s court meeting on Tuesday.

State data shows 3,683 people have been fatally shot in Texas. This includes the 21 victims of the Robb Elementary School shooting in Uvalde.

“Things are getting worse, not better,” Wolff said.

The approved funding is divided into four main elements.

First, the purchase of locks and security devices for firearms and the establishment of distribution centers.

“We have a young woman who ran away from home and took a relative’s gun with her. And then this weapon was used in at least one violent crime that we know of,” Bexar County Sheriff Javier Salazar told the commissioners.

A d

Salazar said the current gun lock program is working, but lacks locks. He plans to use the funding to purchase more gun locks and hold more pop-up events to distribute them. He said all of his deputies carried padlocks in their vehicles and anyone in public could ask for one.

“It can reduce the chances of their guns being stolen by their own children, or by strangers, and used to commit some sort of crime,” Salazar said.

He pointed out that responsible gun ownership would also help reduce accidental shootings and suicides.

The second funding is for a county-wide outreach education effort on responsible gun ownership and safe storage.

“We’ve launched a full media campaign — including bus wraps, ads, radio — but we’re also going to dive into some of those grassroots efforts to make sure every corner of the county is reached,” said Bexar County Public Information Officer. Monica Ramos.

A d

The third section would fund mental health programs, training for law enforcement, adding psychiatric inpatient beds for adults and minors, and creating a crisis line.

“This trend of crisis, shrinking beds, constantly disappearing funding is endemic in Texas. We are basically on the bottom,” Probate Court 1 Judge Oscar Kazen said.

Judge Kazen is also co-chair of the Bexar County Task Force on Criminal Justice and Behavioral Health, made up of five committees looking for ways to improve access to mental health.

“We probably handle close to 5,000 mental health cases a year,” Kazen said of his court. “These are the most serious cases. In addition to those 5,000, we have 10,000 emergency detentions that this community is absorbing in their emergency rooms with the very few beds that we have funded. Then we have tens of thousands of people who have never even touched the system because their families whisper about their illness and they are afraid to reach out.

A d

This task force will continue its work with the help of some of the new county funding.

The final tranche of money will go towards mental health services in county schools, training and hiring counselors.

Those present at the meeting believe this is crucial to stopping mass shootings like Uvalde’s.

ALSO ON KSAT.COM

Bexar County Judge Nelson Wolff writes letter to Texas Governor Abbott and requests special session on gun violence

Bexar County leaders demand action from Abbott, outline plans to end gun violence in the community

A d

Uvalde school shooting reignites gun control debate

Copyright 2022 by KSAT – All rights reserved.

]]>
Lack of mental health resources is creating a crisis, lawmakers said | Regional News https://nefloridacounts.org/lack-of-mental-health-resources-is-creating-a-crisis-lawmakers-said-regional-news/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 18:15:00 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/lack-of-mental-health-resources-is-creating-a-crisis-lawmakers-said-regional-news/ CHEYENNE — Health care advocates told lawmakers Friday that a lack of mental health resources, such as emergency centers, infrastructure, staff and funding, has caused gaps in crisis care across the country. Wyoming. These shortcomings extend to non-emergency mental health services, but the focus was on stabilizing the crisis during the Wyoming Legislature’s Joint Labor, […]]]>

CHEYENNE — Health care advocates told lawmakers Friday that a lack of mental health resources, such as emergency centers, infrastructure, staff and funding, has caused gaps in crisis care across the country. Wyoming.

These shortcomings extend to non-emergency mental health services, but the focus was on stabilizing the crisis during the Wyoming Legislature’s Joint Labor, Health and Human Services Committee. A mental health crisis differs from basic mental health care in that if the person experiencing a psychiatric episode is not treated, they may need to be placed in a more extensive clinical setting, such as hospitalization.

There are currently four regional crisis stabilization providers across five regions and 27 total beds available in the state, costing nearly $4 million in the 2021-22 biennial budget.

Wyoming Department of Health officials said this has led to housing, transportation and access issues for residents.

Committee chair, Rep. Sue Wilson, R-Cheyenne, also called attention to historic cases where someone with an acute episode often turns into a law enforcement problem. Any situation in which a person’s behavior exposes them to injury to themselves or others and/or prevents them from taking care of themselves or functioning is a crisis.

“I think we can all agree that a prison is not the setting where people should be treated,” she told committee members. “And we don’t want one person’s situation spreading to other parts of the community.”

She said what you see on the news is usually a bad result.

Discussions surrounding mental health have been at the forefront of state and federal legislatures across the country in the wake of shootings in New York, Texas and Oklahoma, and it’s not a new topic for the US legislature. Wyoming. During the 20-day budget session earlier this year, lawmakers on both sides of the aisle debated additional funding for mental health services in the 2023-24 biennial budget and bailout appropriations. American. The governing body approved an initial $7 million in ARPA dollars for construction specific to crisis stabilization and women’s residential treatment, but requests for credits to improve the suicide lifeline have not been approved.

According to Mental Health America, Wyoming ranks last in the nation for youth mental health services, 48th for access to overall mental health care, and 40th for prevalence of mental illness.

Yet suicide rates are much higher than the national average. In a report provided by the Wyoming Department of Health proposing funding solutions to develop psychiatric residential treatment facilities, it was noted that between 2009 and 2019, the annual age-adjusted suicide rate per 100,000 was 29.9, while the national average is currently 13.42.

The Kaiser Family Foundation also found that the percentage of need for mental health professionals encountered in Wyoming is only 47.1%.

Understanding the state’s mental health care environment and its crisis shortcomings is why Wilson said the labor committee met on Friday, though she doesn’t have a set yet. specific solutions in mind.

“We just need to understand what we’re doing, what we’re not doing, what’s needed and how can we move forward,” she said.

Stefan Johansson, director of the Wyoming Department of Health, and Andi Summerville, director of the Wyoming Association of Mental Health and Addiction Centers, were present at the meeting to provide context. Both identified problems and showed lawmakers where improvements were needed.

From a state perspective, Johansson said there is a lack of emergency and crisis services for children and adolescents – resources such as crisis infrastructure, personnel, logistics and funding, as well as agreements with stakeholders and community resources. He also sees a need for more evidence-based emergency response services, such as a 24-hour crisis stabilization call center, mobile emergency services and emergency response teams. emergency.

“When people are often decompensated (losing their ability to maintain normal or appropriate psychological defenses) in the community, and law enforcement is often involved, we have seen and observed success when there is either a place to take that person that’s not a prison or a hospital,” he said. “That’s accessible to those who might have a lower level of care and spend a day or two in a crisis center.”

These locations are also important because they can also provide a “step down” for people with mental illness from more restrictive settings, such as inpatient hospitalization and correctional settings.

Summerville made similar remarks to the Labor Committee and stressed that these services must be part of a comprehensive statewide network in the least restrictive setting in order to respond to mental health crisis care. Options currently available are the 998/Suicide Lifeline, 24/7 Community Mental Health Center Network and Crisis Stabilization Infrastructure, as well as Hospital Emergency Departments, Inpatient and public hospitals.

However, she said there are limitations in facilities, transportation gaps, difficulties in placing patients in recess, and 23 different counties with their own processes. Nor is the suicide lifeline provided 24/7 by responders in Wyoming.

]]>
Lack of mental health resources in Wyoming is creating a crisis, lawmakers said | Wyoming https://nefloridacounts.org/lack-of-mental-health-resources-in-wyoming-is-creating-a-crisis-lawmakers-said-wyoming/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/lack-of-mental-health-resources-in-wyoming-is-creating-a-crisis-lawmakers-said-wyoming/ CHEYENNE — Health care advocates told lawmakers Friday that a lack of mental health resources, such as emergency centers, infrastructure, staff and funding, has caused gaps in crisis care across the country. Wyoming. These shortcomings extend to non-emergency mental health services, but the focus was on stabilizing the crisis during the Wyoming Legislature’s Joint Labor, […]]]>

CHEYENNE — Health care advocates told lawmakers Friday that a lack of mental health resources, such as emergency centers, infrastructure, staff and funding, has caused gaps in crisis care across the country. Wyoming.

These shortcomings extend to non-emergency mental health services, but the focus was on stabilizing the crisis during the Wyoming Legislature’s Joint Labor, Health and Human Services Committee. A mental health crisis differs from basic mental health care in that if the person experiencing a psychiatric episode is not treated, they may need to be placed in a more extensive clinical setting, such as hospitalization.

There are currently four regional crisis stabilization providers across five regions and 27 total beds available in the state, costing nearly $4 million in the 2021-22 biennial budget. Wyoming Department of Health officials said this has led to housing, transportation and access issues for residents.

Committee chair, Rep. Sue Wilson, R-Cheyenne, also called attention to historic cases where someone with an acute episode often turns into a law enforcement problem. Any situation in which a person’s behavior exposes them to injury to themselves or others and/or prevents them from taking care of themselves or functioning is a crisis.

“I think we can all agree that a prison is not the setting where people should be treated,” she told committee members. “And we don’t want one person’s situation spreading to other parts of the community.”

She said what you see on the news is usually a bad result.

Discussions surrounding mental health have been at the forefront of state and federal legislatures across the country following the shootings in New York, Texas and Oklahoma, and it’s not a new topic for the US legislature. Wyoming. During the 20-day budget session earlier this year, lawmakers on both sides of the aisle debated additional funding for mental health services in the 2023-24 biennial budget and bailout appropriations. American.

The governing body approved an initial $7 million in ARPA dollars for construction specific to crisis stabilization and women’s residential treatment, but requests for credits to improve the suicide lifeline have not been approved.

According to Mental Health America, Wyoming ranks last in the nation for youth mental health services, 48th for access to overall mental health care, and 40th for prevalence of mental illness.

Yet suicide rates are much higher than the national average. In a report provided by the Wyoming Department of Health proposing funding solutions to develop psychiatric residential treatment facilities, it was noted that between 2009 and 2019, the annual age-adjusted suicide rate per 100,000 was 29.9, while the national average is currently 13.42.

The Kaiser Family Foundation also found that the percentage of need for mental health professionals encountered in Wyoming is only 47.1%.

Understanding the state’s mental health care environment and its crisis shortcomings is why Wilson said the labor committee met on Friday, though she doesn’t have a set yet. specific solutions in mind.

“We just need to understand what we’re doing, what we’re not doing, what’s needed and how can we move forward,” she said.

Stefan Johansson, director of the Wyoming Department of Health, and Andi Summerville, director of the Wyoming Association of Mental Health and Addiction Centers, were present at the meeting to provide context. Both identified problems and showed lawmakers where improvements were needed.

From the state’s perspective, Johansson said there is a lack of emergency and crisis services for children and adolescents – resources such as crisis infrastructure, personnel, logistics and funding, as well as agreements with stakeholders and community resources. He also sees a need for more evidence-based emergency response services, such as a 24-hour crisis stabilization call center, mobile emergency services and emergency response teams. emergency.

“When people are often decompensated (losing their ability to maintain normal or appropriate psychological defenses) in the community, and law enforcement is often involved, we have seen and observed success when there is either a place to take that person that’s not a prison or a hospital,” he said. “That’s accessible to those who might have a lower level of care and spend a day or two in a crisis center.”

These locations are also important because they can also provide a “step down” for people with mental illness from more restrictive settings, such as inpatient hospitalization and correctional settings.

Summerville made similar remarks to the Labor Committee and stressed that these services must be part of a comprehensive statewide network in the least restrictive setting in order to respond to mental health crisis care. Options currently available are the 998/Suicide Lifeline, 24/7 Community Mental Health Center Network and Crisis Stabilization Infrastructure, and Hospital Emergency, Inpatient and Hospital Services public.

However, she said there are limitations in facilities, transportation gaps, difficulties in placing patients in recess, and 23 different counties with their own processes. The suicide lifeline is also unstaffed 24/7 by Wyoming responders, and facilities are understaffed.

She said she hopes to see the development of a possible amendment to the state Medicaid plan to secure federal funding, support for the development of two facility additions, behavioral health reform, 24/7 operations and implementations for lifeline and consistent strategy. for adolescents and adults in crisis.

“What we’re missing in Wyoming is a unified, ‘this is how we do crisis,'” she said.

This story was published on June 4.

]]>