Health resources – NE Florida Counts http://nefloridacounts.org/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 08:30:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://nefloridacounts.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/icon-64-150x150.jpg Health resources – NE Florida Counts http://nefloridacounts.org/ 32 32 Mayor Harrell and Council Member Mosqueda advance millions to increase mental health resources for Seattle students https://nefloridacounts.org/mayor-harrell-and-council-member-mosqueda-advance-millions-to-increase-mental-health-resources-for-seattle-students/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 23:10:17 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/mayor-harrell-and-council-member-mosqueda-advance-millions-to-increase-mental-health-resources-for-seattle-students/ Supporting Seattle students after the Ingraham High School shooting, increased funding will bring city investments in mental health resources and school-based health centers to $9.4 million in 2023 and $9.6 million dollars in 2024. Seattle – City Council’s Budget Committee unanimously approved Mayor Bruce Harrell and Councilman Teresa Mosqueda’s joint proposal to increase funding for […]]]>

Supporting Seattle students after the Ingraham High School shooting, increased funding will bring city investments in mental health resources and school-based health centers to $9.4 million in 2023 and $9.6 million dollars in 2024.

Seattle – City Council’s Budget Committee unanimously approved Mayor Bruce Harrell and Councilman Teresa Mosqueda’s joint proposal to increase funding for mental health resources for K-12 students in schools of Seattle by investing a combined total of $4 million over the biennium. This investment of $4 million is in addition to an increased investment of $1 millions in the Mayor’s Proposed Budget, the added $2 million in the Council Member’s Balancing Program, and a joint amendment that invests an additional $1 million in the biennium. This brings the total to $9.4 million in 2023 and $9.6 million in 2024 for mental health services and school health centers.

“Student voices were unequivocal after the heartbreaking shooting at Ingraham High School: To prevent the next tragedy, invest in mental health support and prioritize gun safety” , said Mayor Harrell. “As we enter the final stages of budget deliberations, we are responding to urgent student demands by increasing mental health resources for our students and youth. As we push the state to invest more in this critical need, we are not waiting to ensure students receive expanded support now.

“In times of crisis and loss, it is our paramount responsibility to respond urgently to meet the needs of our community, and in the wake of the tragic shooting at Ingraham High School, we must listen to the voices of students and follow best practices as we prioritize the critical importance of increasing access to mental health resources,” said Budget Chair Mosqueda. “This is a step towards meeting student demands, an indication that we still have a lot of work to do and shows our commitment to doing this work together.”

This investment would increase City funding for mental health supports for students and School Health Centers, which provide increased access to mental health resources, improve health equity and strengthen efforts to screening, intervention and prevention for students in need. Budget action unanimously approved by Council adds $500,000 in 2023 and $500,000 in 2024 for expansion of mental health services for K-12 students using Families, Education funds , Preschool, and Promise Levy, complementing Mayor Harrell’s proposed budget that included a $1 million increase and Councilman Mosqueda’s Balancing Program dedicating $2 million in JumpStart payroll tax funds to K-12 mental health resources.

As described in the State Constitution, funding education is the primary duty of Washington State. While this action provides bridge funding to meet the immediate needs of students, Mayor Harrell and Councilman Mosqueda will continue to push the state to permanently increase ongoing investments in mental health resources, counselors and d other essential services to ensure the behavioral health and well-being of Seattle’s Children.

The municipal council will examine the final adoption of the budget on Monday 28 and Tuesday 29 November.

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Maternal health resources on the go: BP Reynoso launches new campaign https://nefloridacounts.org/maternal-health-resources-on-the-go-bp-reynoso-launches-new-campaign/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 17:42:35 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/maternal-health-resources-on-the-go-bp-reynoso-launches-new-campaign/ Brooklyn Borough President Antonio Reynoso and his new Maternal Health Task Force announced the latest in a series of investments to “make Brooklyn the safest place to have a baby.” “. Preview of the multimedia campaign on maternal health. Photo: Natasha Knows for the BK Reader. The latest investment: A new $250,000 multicultural multimedia campaign, […]]]>

Brooklyn Borough President Antonio Reynoso and his new Maternal Health Task Force announced the latest in a series of investments to “make Brooklyn the safest place to have a baby.” “.

Preview of the multimedia campaign on maternal health. Photo: Natasha Knows for the BK Reader.

The latest investment: A new $250,000 multicultural multimedia campaign, led by Reynoso. The multimedia campaign includes an online resource guide with information on nutrition education, an emotional well-being plan, legal rights to access health insurance, midwifery support and doula services. in the state.

A third of pregnancy-related deaths in New York City are residents of Brooklyn. The ratio is on average 9.4 times higher for births to people of color compared to their white counterparts, and Haitian women account for most of the cases.

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Princeton is improving mental health resources, building on a long-term commitment to student well-being https://nefloridacounts.org/princeton-is-improving-mental-health-resources-building-on-a-long-term-commitment-to-student-well-being/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 14:27:45 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/princeton-is-improving-mental-health-resources-building-on-a-long-term-commitment-to-student-well-being/ Princeton has begun implementing improvements to its mental health and wellness resources, as recommended by a summer task force comprised of leaders from campus life, health services and the student government. The expansion of mental health resources includes: Counseling and Psychology Services (CPS) will hire the equivalent of two new full-time counselors to increase access […]]]>

Princeton has begun implementing improvements to its mental health and wellness resources, as recommended by a summer task force comprised of leaders from campus life, health services and the student government.

The expansion of mental health resources includes:

  • Counseling and Psychology Services (CPS) will hire the equivalent of two new full-time counselors to increase access to mental health care on campus.
  • The CPS Cares line will launch on November 21 to provide students with 24/7 access to a counselor over the phone. CPS will continue to provide same-day in-person services through urgent care for students who prefer to meet with a counselor in person.
  • CPS will offer extended initial consultations so that students can meet more of their needs during their first appointment. This change will take effect at the end of the semester.

Vice President for Campus Life W. Rochelle Calhoun said the University’s goal is to support student well-being in a comprehensive, holistic and inclusive manner. She said part of that work is cultivating stronger bonds between groups across campus with events like the recent Community of Care breakfast for students, faculty and staff.

“We continually review our programs and assess where new approaches or services may be needed,” Calhoun said.

Last summer, representatives from the Office of the Vice President for Campus Life (VPCL) and University Health Services (UHS) worked with the Undergraduate Student Government to review current mental health resources and explore ways to improve access to and awareness of mental health resources on campus and beyond.

Other recommendations from the Student-Staff Task Force are underway, including further improvements to CPS services and staff, funding for transportation to off-campus mental health services, and improving mental health resources and crisis intervention based in residential colleges.

These actions build on more than a decade of work to expand mental health and wellness programs, services, staff, and funding to support undergraduate and graduate students. Resources are offered by UHS, VPCL, Office of the Dean of Undergraduates, Graduate School, Office of Religious Life, residential colleges, and many other departments.

“At Princeton, we aspire to ensure that a health and wellness mindset is embedded in everything we do so that our students continue to reach their potential and thrive,” said the Executive Director of University Health Services, John Kolligian. “We have made progress and there is still a long way to go before we can achieve our goals as a health-promoting university.”

As colleges and universities across the country experience an increase in the number of students seeking mental health care in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, Princeton has also worked to improve its support systems for students. undergraduate and graduate.

“Research has shown that the mental health of everyone, and especially young adults, has deteriorated significantly as a result of the pandemic,” said CPS director Calvin Chin. “My colleagues at other Ivy institutions are managing increases in demand similar to what we are seeing at Princeton.”

Chin said the CPS has increased its membership in recent years, even before the pandemic, and has launched several initiatives to increase access to mental health services, including funding the University to help students pay for mental health treatment.

Previous advisory resource enhancements include:

  • The creation of the Exclusive Provider Network, made up of over 200 community therapists who accept the student health plan and charge students a $20 co-pay with no deductible, to increase access for students who needed ongoing treatment.
  • The creation of TigerWell Outreach Counselors, who provide walk-in counseling services on campus, making it easier for students to connect with counselors outside of McCosh Health Center.

University Health Services also offers a range of educational and support programs through its Health Promotion and Prevention Services, including the UMatter Witness Intervention Program, Peer Health Counselors, and the TigerWell Initiative. . TigerWell engages staff, faculty, undergraduate and graduate student partners in promoting proactive and innovative approaches to health and wellness.

“We want to support our students in all aspects of their lives,” President Christopher L. Eisgruber said in a recent interview with the Daily Princetonian about mental health and other topics.

Eisgruber said there are many programs and staff members focused on supporting students as they face personal challenges and difficult events. He also noted, “We have all felt deeply the losses that have occurred on this campus over the past year. One of the strengths we have as a campus is our ability to respond personally and collectively to these losses.

The University has many staff members that students can turn to for help. This fall, the first cohort of Residential Life Coordinators (RLCs) moved into residential colleges to support and promote the health, safety and well-being of students at each residential college. Reporting to the Assistant Deans for Student Life and working with Boarding School Counselors, RLCs are readily available to respond to crises and emergencies.

“Princeton is blessed to surround its students with literally, many caring adult personalities – teachers, chaplains, coaches, residential life staff, administrators of all kinds,” said Reverend Alison Boden, Dean of Religious Life and the chapel. . “Compared to the general youth population, we actually have tremendous support. It doesn’t mean our students are less at risk for mental health issues, but it does mean we’re better prepared to help them.

Other mental health and wellness resources include, but are not limited to:

In addition to campus resources for students, faculty and staff who need support can speak to independent counselors by calling Carebridge at 800-437-0911 or scheduling in-person counseling online at the Wellness Center employees at 350 Alexander Street.

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COLUMN: Fast-growing Surrey must get its fair share of healthcare resources https://nefloridacounts.org/column-fast-growing-surrey-must-get-its-fair-share-of-healthcare-resources/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 22:20:00 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/column-fast-growing-surrey-must-get-its-fair-share-of-healthcare-resources/ Returning World War II veterans were the catalyst for the construction of Surrey Memorial Hospital. Surrey’s northern slopes had been heavily logged in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, creating large tracts of building land for returning servicemen and their families. During this period of rapid population growth, the city of Surrey, which then […]]]>

Returning World War II veterans were the catalyst for the construction of Surrey Memorial Hospital.

Surrey’s northern slopes had been heavily logged in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, creating large tracts of building land for returning servicemen and their families. During this period of rapid population growth, the city of Surrey, which then encompassed present-day White Rock, had a small community hospital in its southernmost corner. It was remote and inaccessible for the growing northern and central population. The only alternative was to cross the Fraser River to access the Royal Columbian Hospital.

Battle-weary veterans and their families found the lack of accessible health care increasingly unfair and intolerable and rallied the public to raise 50% of the cost of building Surrey’s first 150-bed Memorial Hospital. It took them 10 years but they raised the funds.

At the end of their fundraiser, they suffered a setback when the government refused to honor their 50% pledge. The courageous women of Surrey, who had then formed an auxiliary, refused to accept the reversal of the government. They put on their hats and gloves, rented several fixed-wing planes from Boundary Bay Airport, and flew to Victoria to confront the Premier of the Legislative Assembly.

Their visit was successful and construction of the Surrey Hospital Memorial began within a year.

Sixty-seven years later, these brave women, their husbands and their many supporters would be remarkably proud of the role played by Surrey Memorial Hospital in the recent pandemic.

The Surrey Ladies Auxiliary is preparing to travel to Victoria to face the Premier in the Legislative Assembly after the province refused to honor its hospital funding pledge.  (Photo submitted)

The Surrey Ladies Auxiliary is preparing to travel to Victoria to face the Premier in the Legislative Assembly after the province refused to honor its hospital funding pledge. (Photo submitted)

The hospital’s talented medical teams have been called upon to care for BC’s sickest residents. Patients have come to Surrey from all over the province, received the best care and experienced the best outcomes in the world.

Surrey Memorial Hospital is an integral part of British Columbia’s healthcare ecosystem. It is therefore disappointing that per capita investment in specialized services and infrastructure consistently lags behind the rest of Canada.

Surrey is the fastest growing major city in Western Canada, growing 9.7% since 2016, yet it remains the only major city in Canada without a funded emergency department to treat the top three causes of sudden death: heart attack, stroke and trauma. .

Nothing has changed since the 1940s, these services are still only available north of the Fraser River.

Surrey, despite having more children per capita than any other city in Western Canada, has seen a sharp decline in the number of pediatric beds over the past two decades. Surrey went from 24 to 16 of BC’s 443 pediatric hospital beds.

The city of Surrey has the highest birth rate in British Columbia, but it has gained only four new maternity beds in 21 years. The Surrey School District, by comparison, added a 650 pupil primary school and a 700 place secondary school in the 2022/23 year alone.

Due to a lack of specialist services, last year BC Ambulance transported 1,683 Surrey residents from Surrey Memorial Hospital to other towns for emergency care. The top three reasons patients were transferred were heart attacks, strokes and specialist pediatric wards.

The courage and tenacity shown by veterans in the 1940s and 1950s is what is needed today for Surrey to receive its fair share of health care resources.

Community campaigning is the most effective method of convincing all stakeholders to actively plan and build the services and infrastructure needed for a healthy Surrey.

Jane Adams is President and CEO of Surrey Hospital Foundation.


edit@surreynowleader.com
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For many students, mental health resources start at school, but counselors are overwhelmed https://nefloridacounts.org/for-many-students-mental-health-resources-start-at-school-but-counselors-are-overwhelmed/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 16:17:53 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/for-many-students-mental-health-resources-start-at-school-but-counselors-are-overwhelmed/ The issue of ORS was not new: four years ago, student leaders from the Providence Student Union (PSU) launched a campaign to abolish ORS and replace them with school counselors and other school staff. health and safety after frequent reports of harassment and violence by the SRO of students of color. In June 2022, in […]]]>

The issue of ORS was not new: four years ago, student leaders from the Providence Student Union (PSU) launched a campaign to abolish ORS and replace them with school counselors and other school staff. health and safety after frequent reports of harassment and violence by the SRO of students of color. In June 2022, in response to the proposed plan to hire more SROs, the PSU board publicly petitioned against the plan and published an op-ed in The Journal of Providence asking that state funds be used instead to hire more school counselors. Students argued that BIPOC students benefited from the resources offered by the counselors. They have also been disproportionately targeted in school arrests. In 2020, black students made up only 16% of Providence’s student population, but they are more likely to be arrested at school, accounting for 30% of school arrests.

Studies have suggested that school counselors have a role in preventing violence in schools, but counselors often lack the resources and time to intervene effectively. Nationally, school administrators have recently sounded the alarm about a teacher shortage affecting districts. For school counselors, the shortage began long before the pandemic began. In 2019, one school counselor was responsible for an average of 464 students. In states like California, the average was nearly 800 students per counselor in 2018.

Precious López, executive director of PSU, added that the combined effect of underlying and untreated mental health issues in BIPOC communities continues to threaten marginalized students.

“It is unfortunate that the powers that be do not see that mental health is a pandemic in itself. This is something that plagues our BIPOC community,” López said. “So with our campaign, as we try to advocate for the removal of these police officers, we are also trying to show the positive aspects of what mental health resources can do for students and teachers, because burnout is real, not just for our students, but our teachers as well.

PSU has a long history of organizing students for initiatives to improve their education. After settling a federal class action lawsuit for the right to civics classes in June 2022, PSU students will serve on a task force to help develop a civics curriculum for Rhode Island schools. They also advocated for and achieved a pass/fail grading system for the final semester of the 2019-2020 school year to accommodate students during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Gather mental health resources

Belony said their school is a welcome exception to what the data suggests. The Belony School employs five counsellors, each focusing on different groups of students, but each student should have the same kind of access to school resources and support.

“I’ve talked to my friends here at PSU all the time who go to Classical High School or Central High or Mount Pleasant, and they don’t get those things,” Belony said. “And I really feel like when we think about the future of our young people and how we can support them, it starts with giving them and their families those resources.”

But according to López, for communities like Providence, with high concentrations of immigrants and BIPOC families, even starting a conversation about mental health can be a barrier.

“It’s not something discussed in the BIPOC community, is it? It’s like, how do you deal with mental health issues? It’s not something we do. It’s not in our culture,” López said.

For López, giving students an early introduction to mental health resources through school counselors is key to eliminating cultural stigma. She agrees, however, that it can be difficult for students to access these resources. In the past, PSU has partnered with Rhode Island College graduate students who have completed an internship as Wellness Advocates at their Providence headquarters. But as with any nonprofit, López said, the ability to hire interns depends on funding, and this year the budget did not include interns. Nonetheless, López noted that the downside allowed for more innovation to fill gaps in student support.

“We are always trying to find different ways, through workshops and other resources, to provide our students with mental health support,” López said. “Whether it’s a workshop that our students lead or a workshop that we take them to with different organizations, I really focus on mental health and wellbeing.

During the pandemic, the pressures have increased for advisers

During the pandemic, school counselors quickly became the only source of mental health resources, especially in urban and rural communities. A survey by Harvard University’s Graduate School of Education found that many school counselors did not feel supported in their role.

Counselors said they felt forgotten by school administrators. They also said they were concerned for students they knew were having difficulty during remote learning, but did not have clear instructions from school administrators on how to to involve these students.

At the start of the pandemic, counselors also said they were struggling to offer their services to the estimated 50.8 million students who relied on virtual learning. In some cases, districts required parental consent for video counseling, and others required parents to be present during sessions, which created difficulties with parents who were not at home. difficult to reach during school hours or reluctant to have their child receive advice.

Jill Cook, executive director of the American School Counselor Association (ASCA), said the biggest challenges facing counselors relate to all the mental health needs that have arisen during the pandemic. And meanwhile, Cook said it’s easy to forget school counselors aren’t licensed therapists or psychiatrists who can offer long-term help to those who need it most.

“There’s been a lot said and written about this, and there’s certainly a lot of research that has indicated an increase in concerns about pre-pandemic mentality in college students,” Cook said. “But by far most of the concerns reported by school counselors since the pandemic are around anxiety, increased discipline issues, increased absenteeism.”

Cook said that before the pandemic, the profession struggled with an ongoing shortage of school counselors across the country, which only made the problem worse in 2020. Now, Cook adds, with fewer students enrolled in higher education and low rates of graduates with qualifying degrees, there are fewer advisers to meet the suggested student-advisor ratio. Nationally, the ASCA provides one counselor for every 250 students. According to the American Civil Liberties Union, Rhode Island has the highest student-to-counsellor ratio in New England, while other states like Massachusetts will need to hire about 1,000 more school counselors to meet the recommended ratio. .

Now more than ever, Cook says the role of a school counselor is critical to student success, especially for those who may be experiencing anxiety or mental distress because of the pandemic. Additionally, Cook said the ASCA is currently working to diversify the field through local and state initiatives hosted by different chapters of the organization.

“We know that students benefit from teachers, school counselors and educators who are like them in these positions,” she said. “And as our country has diversified, the teaching profession has not. So the good news is that there are people coming into school counseling and education who bring great perspectives and diversity. But there is still a long way to go. We know this from our own members. We are not there yet.

Cook said there was a positive side to the increased awareness of mental health issues created by the pandemic. State governments have funded mental wellness initiatives and hired more school counselors to work in struggling districts.

States like Connecticut have taken steps to empower students to recognize mental health issues by passing legislation in 2021 that allows students to take mental wellness days during the school year. And although Connecticut is one of 12 states to legally allow mental wellness days, few students are aware of the initiative.

For Eugenie Belony, co-director of PSU, advocating for more school counselors and using the resources offered by organizations like PSU is a start to better serve students in Providence. Eventually, however, Belony believes that more intentional action by school leaders and local government will be essential to ensure that BIPOC students receive academic and emotional support in their public schools.

“Yes, we love the community, we work with the community, but we do it so much that sometimes it feels like the schools are missing out,” Belony said. “I think finding ways to fill the gaps through community involvement is great, but something more could be done to hold schools accountable.”

Kio Herrera is a journalist based in New York. She is a graduate of Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism, where she was a Toni Stabile Fellow in Investigative Journalism. His previous work focuses on education, criminal justice and health care. His reporting and research has been published at the Center for Public Integrity, Centro de Periodismo Investigativo de Puerto Rico, The New Republic, and the Marshall Project.

Prism is an independent, nonprofit newsroom run by journalists of color. Our in-depth and thought-provoking journalism reflects the lived experiences of those most affected by injustice. We tell stories from the ground up to disrupt harmful narratives and inform movements for justice. Subscribe to our newsletter to get our stories delivered to your inbox and follow us on Twitter, Facebookand instagram.

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Access mental health resources at the University of Alberta https://nefloridacounts.org/access-mental-health-resources-at-the-university-of-alberta/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 20:07:37 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/access-mental-health-resources-at-the-university-of-alberta/ As the cold weather arrives, with homework piling up and finals just weeks away, it’s a time of year when many students begin to experience heightened mental health issues. The University of Alberta offers many services, supports, and resources that can help students meet their mental health needs, but knowing where to turn can feel […]]]>

As the cold weather arrives, with homework piling up and finals just weeks away, it’s a time of year when many students begin to experience heightened mental health issues. The University of Alberta offers many services, supports, and resources that can help students meet their mental health needs, but knowing where to turn can feel overwhelming with so many options. To better understand what’s available and where to go, I interviewed Kevin Friese, Assistant Dean of Students, Health and Wellness, Office of the Dean of Students.

Kevin Friese, Assistant Dean, Health and Wellness

Do you have any general advice on mental health and wellbeing?

Often we conceive of mental health as something that is an individual responsibility, which is neither fair nor realistic. If your mental health is deteriorating, you are not to blame – societal and community factors play an important role.

Often the things in life can cause us to feel bad mentally – ending a relationship, financial problems, difficulties in school or food insecurity. Help to remedy this can go a long way.

Remember that preventive measures count a lot. Taking care of yourself and others can help keep someone on track, possibly avoiding the need for interventions and clinical care.

What supports and services am I entitled to as a current U of A student? How can I access it?

This link is my go-to for students in terms of taking care of themselves, whether it’s traditional resources related to mental health and well-being, academic success, or other areas. .

If someone just needs to hit the ground running, maybe they’ve had relationship difficulties, are frustrated, or are struggling with their studies, I’d recommend a few options. There is SU Service – Peer Support, where peers are trained and have the experience to be able to provide supportive listening. There is also the Unitea program, which allows someone to book coffee or tea with a peer volunteer to come together to sit and chat in a relaxed atmosphere. Professional help is available when someone needs it, but reaching out or educating each other can often make a big difference.

I would recommend Wellness Supports as a first point of contact when someone doesn’t know where to turn. The on-site social work team can offer one-on-one counseling and help connect someone to supports and services based on their individual needs. This is really helpful when life circumstances make us sick.

Counseling and Clinical Services is our full service clinic with psychologists, mental health consultants and psychiatrists. They offer everything from individual counseling services to group therapy to educational workshops. Some of them are specific to reducing anxiety and stress, while others provide tips for managing your time. The nice thing about these workshops is that they are one-time sessions so people can come, attend, and not worry about finishing a whole series.

The University Health Center is our full-service medical clinic accessible to students and their immediate families. Often, some students may feel more comfortable talking about their mental health and well-being with a family doctor. The CHU Medical Clinic provides access to a range of clinicians, including family physicians, mental health therapists and medical specialists.

The Sexual Assault Center offers specialized support to victims of sexual violence. The team specializes in supporting survivors, offering volunteer-led education workshops and providing specialized psychological care to students.

Finally, there is the Military and Veteran Friendly Campus initiative, which serves a small but valued population of our student body. If a military or veteran student is struggling, MVFC provides contextualized services and can help a student navigate the complexities of campus mental health and social support services.

If someone is struggling to take a course due to mental health issues, what are the options? Or if struggles in a class are contributing to a mental health issue, what can someone do?

The first place someone should go if they are having difficulty in a class is to talk to the professor or instructor. Instructors schedule office hours and set aside time to meet with students. Letting them know you’re having trouble can often help the instructor work through it, too. if one student is struggling, chances are other students are too.

Your professor can help you explore academic options and determine if an exam deferral should be granted to allow you to focus on your recovery and recovery. If you are still having difficulty after this process and need further assistance, you can contact the Dean of Students’ office. We work with professors, faculties and students to find solutions that work for all parties involved.

The Academic Success Center can help if a student with a documented disability or injury needs support or accommodations, and they also offer a range of academic services such as writing aids, communication skills and scheduling of exams. These are intended to help students develop their skills and toolkit to maintain their academic well-being.

As I mentioned earlier, if you don’t know where to turn, Wellness Supports is a great place to start, they are experts in connecting students to services.

This is specific to grad students, but the Grad School Confidential is a podcast that aims to reduce the stigma around the academic and personal challenges faced by members of this group.

A friend is struggling with a mental health issue. Is there a way to support them?

A good first step is to be a supportive friend – to listen to the present moment, to be there, and not to seek to step in and advise or judge their particular situation or circumstance. Normalize how someone feels because often they are not alone and many of us have been in a similar situation. It can make a big difference for people to feel heard and have their concerns understood. Don’t worry about saying the wrong thing; listen with empathy.

Wellness Supports offers a range of workshops that can help students build their toolkit to support their peers and community. Again, this is a good reference point for students. The team can connect them with someone who will care about their well-being and can explore next steps.

By listening to each other without judgment and checking in regularly, we begin to foster a caring community, which goes a long way toward making everyone feel valued, validated, and supported.

What tactics can be used during mid-terms, finals and other stressful times to manage stress levels and emotions?

If we consider our well-being as a train on the tracks, it is much easier. If you start to derail, it’s much easier to get that train back on track with preventative measures instead of letting the train get to a point where more help is needed. I have a few tips that may help:

  • Sleep hygiene is paramount, making sure we get enough sleep, avoiding cramming and sleepless nights – you’ll be more focused and productive if you’re well rested.
  • Remember to take a break and clear your head. Allow yourself to decompress and cool off a bit by finding activities that fill you with joy. For some people, it takes time to read a book or make art; for others, it’s about exercising or going outside.
  • Build your academic toolkit and coping strategies with workshops through the Academic Success Center, Wellness Support and Counseling Services, and Clinical Services, which can strengthen your academics and improve your academic skills. personal and community adaptation.
  • Check in regularly with your friends to see how they are doing and offer to listen to them. Supporting each other is really essential to reduce stress. This can take many forms – it could be literally checking in, cooking a meal together, or doing a group activity.

Will managing physical health and well-being help mental health? Does the U of A offer resources for this?

We know that there are clear links between our physical health and our mental health. Campus Community Recreation (CCR) is a great resource that students can access as part of their college fees. It offers a range of recreational facilities such as swimming pools, ice rinks, track, weight room, intramural sports, climbing walls, fitness classes, group recreational activities and more . Additionally, Counseling and Clinical Services offer on-campus yoga classes during the week.

Around the north campus there is the outdoor gym, available all year round, and an outdoor ping pong table located just outside this Van Vliet center which students can use during school breaks. non-winter months.

If students want to move around a bit while they work on assignments or study, CCR also offers treadmill desks at a number of campuses.

Finally, I recommend checking out what’s going on in the larger community around Edmonton. We live in a city that has amazing festivals and resources. Being a winter town, these are available all year round.

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In Montana, lack of mental health resources linked to growing gun violence, especially in hospitals https://nefloridacounts.org/in-montana-lack-of-mental-health-resources-linked-to-growing-gun-violence-especially-in-hospitals/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 13:30:00 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/in-montana-lack-of-mental-health-resources-linked-to-growing-gun-violence-especially-in-hospitals/ It’s hard to ignore the near-daily headlines about gun violence, overdoses, and crime, especially since many Montana residents remember that the state was once a much more peaceful place. The articles are widely read as locals can’t seem to take their eyes off the frequent violence that creeps closer to people’s backyards. Many medical professionals […]]]>

It’s hard to ignore the near-daily headlines about gun violence, overdoses, and crime, especially since many Montana residents remember that the state was once a much more peaceful place. The articles are widely read as locals can’t seem to take their eyes off the frequent violence that creeps closer to people’s backyards.

Many medical professionals have pointed to the severe lack of mental health resources in the state as one of the drivers for the increase in community violence. However, everyone is careful to point out that mental illness is not synonymous with violence.

Overall, violence is rare among people with mental disorders. But when mental illness goes untreated and is linked to other co-occurring issues like substance use disorders, environmental factors, or child abuse and neglect, risk factors for violent behavior can peak.

Three Montana murder-suicides in one week, including two in just over 24 hours, were particularly telling for Community Crisis Center director Marcee Nearly.

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“It’s clear that (people) aren’t getting the treatment they need,” Nearly said.

When mental illness is managed with professional help, most people can lead normal lives, but when left untreated, symptoms sometimes peak in hospital emergency departments.

Employees at Billings Clinic and St. Vincent Healthcare have noticed an increase in patients seeking treatment while in the midst of a mental health crisis. These patients tend to contribute more significantly to the increase in violence in hospitals.

A national survey found that 42% of emergency department attackers were psychiatric patients and 40% involved patients seeking drugs or under the influence of drugs or alcohol, according to the American College of Emergency Physicians.

But of the 163,000 Montanese diagnosed with a mental health condition and 44,000 citizens with serious mental illness, at least 47,000 people did not receive the mental health care they needed in 2020. Of those 48.6% did not receive care due to cost, according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness.

“The number (of assaults) has increased as substance use disorders (have changed), as different drugs have entered our community, as our communities have grown, but the resources have diminished” said Brad Von Bergen, Billings Clinic ED manager. “There’s a lot more financial pressure on people these days and people are dealing with alcohol, they’re dealing with drugs.”

Von Bergen worked as a registered nurse at the clinic for 30 years and noticed more mental health crises happening in the ER than ever before.






Billings Clinic emergency department manager Brad Von Bergen sits in a hospital bed in the surge unit in a hospital hallway in this October file photo. The hallway surge unit is used when the emergency department lacks traditional spaces to accommodate patients.


RYAN BERRY, Billings Gazette


emergency departurecomments

The Oct. 16 shooting at the Billings Clinic emergency department was a stark reminder of the scale of the mental health crisis plaguing Montana. During the incident, a suicidal patient suffered two gunshot wounds, one self-inflicted and the other by a responding police officer.

The management of the Billings Clinic emergency department said the increase in gun violence in Billings may be linked to the lack of mental health resources statewide.

“The resources available to people outside of the Billings Clinic have (decreased),” Von Bergen said. “It made it really difficult for our community when they needed help or had that place to go and now they don’t.”

When these people are in crisis, some end up at the Community Crisis Centre. If there is an overflow, people end up in emergency departments, Von Bergen said.

The clinic’s emergency director, Dr Jaimee Belsky, said people should always go to the emergency room if they are in crisis, but pointed to the lack of mental health resources in the community as the reason for the overflow of psychiatric units and long waits for the state psychiatric hospital. .







Billings Clinic Emergency Department

Billings Clinic emergency room medical director Jamiee Belsky shows off her emergency tag which alerts the clinic’s internal security team in the event of an emergency. Staff are equipped with these beacons and they were used the night of the ER shooting.


AMY LYNN NELSON, Billings Gazette


Referring patients to specialist psychiatric care is where dealing with mental health crises in the emergency room gets tricky.

When there are no beds available, patients end up boarding the emergency room, which isn’t very comfortable for an extended stay, Blesky said.

“It’s also just the nurses and what they’re trained to do. Our nurses are still trying to (treat patients in the emergency room), but at the same time they also have to monitor that patient at the same time,” Belsky said.

Counselors can spend one-on-one time with patients in the emergency room, but patients don’t have access to the group therapies that are often an integral part of treatment.

With more mental health care providers, more group therapy sessions, and more support services available, people may be seeking treatment for mental illness.

“Building (community) resources would give us more tools,” Blesky said. “I think that would help tremendously because they will redirect care immediately. So we’re not going to have as many acute attacks, but they’re also going to help you get out of (crisis care). »







Billings Clinic emergency department implements more safety measures after shooting

Billings Clinic Emergency Department Medical Director Jamiee Belsky and Emergency Department Director Brad Von Bergen work in their department on Friday, October 28.


AMY LYNN NELSON, Billings Gazette


The reduction in the State budget harms the treatment

Making an appointment with a mental health provider is becoming increasingly difficult in Montana. Therapists are full for months and waiting lists sometimes stretch beyond six months.

Community resources in rural areas in particular have evaporated at an alarming rate, according to Mary Windecker, executive director of the Behavioral Health Alliance of Montana.

The 2017 state budget cuts to the Department of Health and Human Services were largely responsible for the ensuing mental health crisis, Windecker said.

Prior to the $49 million budget cut, Montanans had access to social workers in their community who helped them stay on top of medications and access therapy to manage symptoms of mental illness or alcohol-related disorder. substance use (SUD). These resources allowed people to live relatively normal lives, Windecker said.

After budget cuts, social workers and providers were laid off en masse, and state mental health centers could no longer afford the same staff.

So when the pandemic hit, resources were already dwindling. People in Montana have faced blockages, isolation, loss and fear, and the mental health crisis has grown.

Now, historical discrepancies in Medicaid reimbursement rates have had a negative impact on behavioral health in almost every medical sector.

It is even more difficult to meet the demand now that accepting Medicaid comes with a significant financial loss. Facilities have limited the number of staffed vendors to keep doors open, Windecker said.

Professionals have summed up the situation as a mental health crisis that is, in some ways, unique to Montana.

This year alone, Billings was ranked as the most depressed town in the country. Thirty-one percent of residents have been diagnosed with depression by a professional, according to data from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention.

And due to widespread cultural stigma, Windecker expects there are countless people living with an undiagnosed mental health condition, though it’s hard to estimate without data.

But the data on those diagnosed are well documented.

In February 2021, about 35% of adults in Montana reported symptoms of anxiety or depression, but about 18% were unable to access counseling or therapy services, according to data from the Montana Chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI).

In Montana, 44,000 adults suffer from serious mental illness and among the homeless population, one in four lives with serious mental illness.

Substance use disorders often develop as a way to cope with or mask symptoms of mental illness, Windecker said.

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, substance use disorder (SUD) accompanies other mental illnesses about 25% of the time. And those who receive treatment for over-the-counter opioids are diagnosed with or show symptoms of mental illness 43% of the time.

“You can’t treat substance use disorders without treating mental health,” Windecker said.

Legislationnot

Windecker, in partnership with the Department of Health and Human Services, plans to propose a new model that would place mental health and addiction treatment on the same level of reimbursement as physical health for the first time.

The model, called Certified Community Behavioral Health Centers (CCBHC), would also be accessible in rural and border communities.

“We reviewed many aspects of the model to ensure it would meet the state’s rural and frontier needs and replace community services that were decimated by the 2017/2018 budget cuts,” Windecker said.

It will also be imperative that the 2023 Legislature adopt the recommendations of the Governor’s Supplier Rate Study, Windecker said.

The rate study found that most programs needed a 10 to 25 percent increase in Medicaid rates to remain viable. The total cost to the state to cover the cost of these services is $32 million.

“Without these safety net providers, the mental health and addiction treatment system will collapse,” Windecker said. “With a $1.7 billion revenue surplus and a recreational marijuana tax available, this is a small amount to spend fixing a system that has long been underfunded and running at a loss. “

Aldwyn Boscawen, founder of Morale (moraleapp.co), offered some tips for tackling tough topics.



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Southwestern Health Resources and Dialyze Direct are working together to provide post-acute dialysis to patients referred to skilled nursing facilities https://nefloridacounts.org/southwestern-health-resources-and-dialyze-direct-are-working-together-to-provide-post-acute-dialysis-to-patients-referred-to-skilled-nursing-facilities/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 13:24:00 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/southwestern-health-resources-and-dialyze-direct-are-working-together-to-provide-post-acute-dialysis-to-patients-referred-to-skilled-nursing-facilities/ Affiliation creates a beneficial approach to continuity of care for geriatric patients with end-stage renal disease, ssimplify patient placement in single locations for rehabilitation, dialysis and recovery while reducing pressure on SWHR resources. BROOKLYN, NY, November 04, 2022–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Dialyze Direct, the nation’s leading provider of home hemodialysis services in Skilled Nursing (SNF) facilities, today announced […]]]>

Affiliation creates a beneficial approach to continuity of care for geriatric patients with end-stage renal disease, ssimplify patient placement in single locations for rehabilitation, dialysis and recovery while reducing pressure on SWHR resources.

BROOKLYN, NY, November 04, 2022–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Dialyze Direct, the nation’s leading provider of home hemodialysis services in Skilled Nursing (SNF) facilities, today announced that effective January 1, 2023, it will be a preferred supplier for Southwestern Health Resources (SWHR), a clinically integrated network created by the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and Texas Health Resources.

Membership ensures that patients requiring managed dialysis and rehabilitative care can transfer care from the hospital to a facility where they can maintain and even improve their recovery progress by having access to the gentler and more frequent dialysis regimen. (MFD) assisted by Dialyze Direct staff. MFD has been proven to offer results such as decreased mortality, fewer re-hospitalizations, faster dialysis recovery time (DRT), reduced infections, greater availability for rehabilitation therapies and increased comfort and well-being.

“Our unique model involves a three-pronged effort to bridge the gap between hospital systems and SNFs to create continuity of care for patients well enough to thrive outside of the institutional setting in the home environment that SNFs provide” , said Robert Aberman, SVP, Population Health at Dialyse Direct. “We are excited to begin our association with SWHR to help them provide patients with a gentler form of dialysis care through our network of SNF partners in North Texas, as part of this care coordination agreement. with preferred suppliers. »

Dialyze Direct’s approach is to establish dialysis treatment “dens” within SNF that typically serve 10-18 patients per day, five days per week. The American Heart Association recently endorsed home dialysis therapies, including the MFD modality, in a published report that summarizes many of Dialyze Direct’s key findings on its MFD.

Traditionally, dialysis patients residing in NFCs represent one of the costliest patient populations for insurance plans and hospital systems. With Dialyze Direct, SNF’s partnership model is designed to include the dialysis care team, SNF staff and the patient’s physician in care management. As a result, patients are readmitted to hospital less, discharged from hospital sooner, recover faster after treatment, and achieve a better quality of life. Dialyze Direct continues to form new SNF partnerships and dialysis dens in Texas and other parts of the country, reaching more patients with its life-improving dialysis treatment.

About Southwest Health Resources

Southwestern Health Resources (SWHR) is a clinically integrated, patient-centered network of 31 hospitals and more than 5,500 physicians and clinicians serving more than 730,000 people in 16 North Texas counties. Combining the strengths of Texas Health Resources and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, SWHR offers an unparalleled ability to connect individuals with a full spectrum of nationally preeminent clinical care. Over the past four years, SWHR has been recognized by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services as a Next Generation Accountable Care Organization for Shared Economies, generating more than $38 million in 2020 and nearly $158 million in Medicare savings since 2017.

About Dialysis Direct

Founded in 2015, Dialyze Direct is a leading kidney care innovation company that seeks innovative solutions for patients with kidney disease. With a mission to build the next generation of kidney care, Dialyze Direct relies on its leading nephrology specialists to develop new methods and technologies to advance the treatment options available to nephrologists. Dialyze Direct was the first to make significant changes to the existing treatment model for dialysis patients in Skilled Nursing (SNF) facilities, where many of the most medically challenging subsets of dialysis patients reside. , and has become the largest national provider of home dialysis in the SNF. setting. Dialyze Direct’s innovative staff-assisted home hemodialysis treatment model involves a gentler personalized treatment plan comprised of meticulously crafted protocols designed to address the unique fluid management challenges of geriatric dialysis patients, resulting in improved overall patient health and reduced hospitalizations while significantly reducing costs to payers. Dialyze Direct currently operates in 14 states and new operations will soon be launched in other states. www.DialyseDirect.com.

See the source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20221104005385/en/

contacts

Zumado Public Relations
Nicholas Gaffney
ngaffney@zumado.com
415-732-7801

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For Rhode Island BIPOC students, mental health resources start at school https://nefloridacounts.org/for-rhode-island-bipoc-students-mental-health-resources-start-at-school/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/for-rhode-island-bipoc-students-mental-health-resources-start-at-school/ In May 2022, federal data from the Institute of Educational Sciences confirmed an ongoing mental health crisis in public schools nationwide after reporting that 70% of schools reported an increase in the percentage of students seeking mental health services since the start of the pandemic. School counselors have become especially important as districts report an […]]]>

In May 2022, federal data from the Institute of Educational Sciences confirmed an ongoing mental health crisis in public schools nationwide after reporting that 70% of schools reported an increase in the percentage of students seeking mental health services since the start of the pandemic. School counselors have become especially important as districts report an increase in disruption and violent behavior during school hours, which educators and experts have attributed to high stress levels, financial insecurity and loss of life. inexorable suffered during the first two years of the pandemic.

But in Rhode Island, rather than increasing the number of counselors in schools, state lawmakers introduced a bill to place two school resource officers (SROs) in every school in the state. The plan was introduced at a state general meeting on June 2, 2022, following the May 24 shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas.

The issue of ORS was not new: four years ago, student leaders from the Providence Student Union (PSU) launched a campaign to abolish ORS and replace them with school counselors and other school staff. health and safety after frequent reports of harassment and violence by the SRO of students of color. In June 2022, in response to the proposed plan to hire more SROs, the PSU board of directors publicly petitioned against the plan and published an op-ed in The Providence Journal urging that state funds be instead used to hire more school counsellors. Students argued that BIPOC students benefited from the resources offered by the counselors. They have also been disproportionately targeted in school arrests. In 2020, black students made up only 16% of Providence’s student population, but they are more likely to be arrested at school, accounting for 30% of school arrests.

Studies have suggested that school counselors have a role in preventing violence in schools, but counselors often lack the resources and time to intervene effectively. Nationally, school administrators have recently sounded the alarm about a teacher shortage affecting districts. For school counselors, the shortage began long before the pandemic began. In 2019, one school counselor was responsible for an average of 464 students. In states like California, the average was nearly 800 students per counselor in 2018.

Precious López, executive director of PSU, added that the combined effect of underlying and untreated mental health issues in BIPOC communities continues to threaten marginalized students.

“It is unfortunate that the powers that be do not see that mental health is a pandemic in itself. This is something that plagues our BIPOC community,” López said. “So with our campaign, as we try to advocate for the removal of these police officers, we are also trying to show the positive aspects of what mental health resources can do for students and teachers, because burnout is real, not just for our students, but our teachers as well.

PSU has a long history of organizing students for initiatives to improve their education. After settling a federal class action lawsuit for the right to civics classes in June 2022, PSU students will serve on a task force to help develop a civics curriculum for Rhode Island schools. They also advocated for and achieved a pass/fail grading system for the final semester of the 2019-2020 school year to accommodate students during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Gather mental health resources

Belony said their school is a welcome exception to what the data suggests. The Belony School employs five counsellors, each focusing on different groups of students, but each student should have the same kind of access to school resources and support.

“I’ve talked to my friends here at PSU all the time who go to Classical High School or Central High or Mount Pleasant, and they don’t get those things,” Belony said. “And I really feel like when we think about the future of our young people and how we can support them, it starts with giving them and their families those resources.”

But according to López, for communities like Providence, with high concentrations of immigrants and BIPOC families, even starting a conversation about mental health can be a barrier.

“It’s not something discussed in the BIPOC community, is it? It’s like, how do you deal with mental health issues? It’s not something we do. It’s not in our culture,” López said.

For López, giving students an early introduction to mental health resources through school counselors is key to eliminating cultural stigma. She agrees, however, that it can be difficult for students to access these resources. In the past, PSU has partnered with Rhode Island College graduate students who have completed an internship as Wellness Advocates at their Providence headquarters. But as with any nonprofit, López said, the ability to hire interns depends on funding, and this year the budget did not include interns. Nonetheless, López noted that the downside allowed for more innovation to fill gaps in student support.

“We are always trying to find different ways, through workshops and other resources, to provide our students with mental health support,” López said. “Whether it’s a workshop that our students lead or a workshop that we take them to with different organizations, I really focus on mental health and wellbeing.

During the pandemic, the pressures have increased for advisers

During the pandemic, school counselors quickly became the only source of mental health resources, especially in urban and rural communities. A survey by Harvard University’s Graduate School of Education found that many school counselors did not feel supported in their role.

Counselors said they felt forgotten by school administrators. They also said they were concerned for students they knew were having difficulty during remote learning, but did not have clear instructions from school administrators on how to to involve these students.

At the start of the pandemic, counselors also said they were struggling to offer their services to the estimated 50.8 million students who relied on virtual learning. In some cases, districts required parental consent for video counseling, and others required parents to be present during sessions, which created difficulties with parents who were not at home. difficult to reach during school hours or reluctant to have their child receive advice.

Jill Cook, executive director of the American School Counselor Association (ASCA), said the biggest challenges facing counselors relate to all the mental health needs that have arisen during the pandemic. And meanwhile, Cook said it’s easy to forget school counselors aren’t licensed therapists or psychiatrists who can offer long-term help to those who need it most.

“There’s been a lot said and written about this, and there’s certainly a lot of research that has indicated an increase in concerns about pre-pandemic mentality in college students,” Cook said. “But by far most of the concerns reported by school counselors since the pandemic are around anxiety, increased discipline issues, increased absenteeism.”

Cook said that before the pandemic, the profession struggled with an ongoing shortage of school counselors across the country, which only made the problem worse in 2020. Now, Cook adds, with fewer students enrolled in higher education and low rates of graduates with qualifying degrees, there are fewer advisers to meet the suggested student-advisor ratio. Nationally, the ASCA provides one counselor for every 250 students. According to the American Civil Liberties Union, Rhode Island has the highest student-to-counsellor ratio in New England, while other states like Massachusetts will need to hire about a thousand additional school counselors to meet the ratio. recommended.

Now more than ever, Cook says the role of a school counselor is critical to student success, especially for those who may be experiencing anxiety or mental distress because of the pandemic. Additionally, Cook said the ASCA is currently working to diversify the field through local and state initiatives hosted by different chapters of the organization.

“We know that students benefit from teachers, school counselors and educators who are like them in these positions,” she said. “And as our country has diversified, the teaching profession has not. So the good news is that there are people coming into school counseling and education who bring great perspectives and diversity. But there is still a long way to go. We know this from our own members. We are not there yet.

Cook said there was a positive side to the increased awareness of mental health issues created by the pandemic. State governments have funded mental wellness initiatives and hired more school counselors to work in struggling districts.

States like Connecticut have taken steps to empower students to recognize mental health issues by passing legislation in 2021 that allows students to take mental wellness days during the school year. And although Connecticut is one of 12 states to legally allow mental wellness days, few students are aware of the initiative.

For Eugenie Belony, co-director of PSU, advocating for more school counselors and using the resources offered by organizations like PSU is a start to better serve students in Providence. Eventually, however, Belony believes that more intentional action by school leaders and local government will be essential to ensure that BIPOC students receive academic and emotional support in their public schools.

“Yes, we love the community, we work with the community, but we do it so much that sometimes it feels like the schools are missing out,” Belony said. “I think finding ways to fill the gaps through community involvement is great, but something more could be done to hold schools accountable.”

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Biden to finally bolster mental health resources in schools https://nefloridacounts.org/biden-to-finally-bolster-mental-health-resources-in-schools/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 16:41:48 +0000 https://nefloridacounts.org/biden-to-finally-bolster-mental-health-resources-in-schools/ The Biden administration is stepping up to address our youth mental health crisis, and not a moment too soon. Even before the pandemic brought social isolation, trauma and loss on a scale never seen before, America’s youth were struggling. Since the pandemic, however, research shows that the mental health of America’s tweens and teens has […]]]>

The Biden administration is stepping up to address our youth mental health crisis, and not a moment too soon. Even before the pandemic brought social isolation, trauma and loss on a scale never seen before, America’s youth were struggling. Since the pandemic, however, research shows that the mental health of America’s tweens and teens has deteriorated and that our schools are not equipped to meet the needs of the children they serve.

Data released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention earlier this year shows that during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic, 44% of teens reported feeling sad or hopeless that persisted for longer. two weeks, 20% of adolescents have considered suicide, and nearly 10% have declared at least one suicide attempt. In marginalized communities, these numbers are even higher.

There is a shortage of mental health staff in schools

One of the challenges teens and school districts face is the notorious lack of mental health staff in schools. “There is a shortage of mental health professionals across the country, whether in the community or at school,” said Kathy Cowan, director of communications for the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP). ABC News. “There is a long-term shortage of mental health professionals employed in schools.”

Currently, the average ratio of students to mental health staff in schools is 1,162:1, while the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) recommends a ratio of 500:1. NASP recommends hiring school psychologists, guidance counselors and social workers, each fulfilling different functions within the school and with the student body.

Biden to provide funds to address mental health crisis in schools

Using funds allocated through the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act (BSCA), a new law against gun violence, the Biden administration plans to fulfill the president’s promise to address the shortage of mental health infrastructure and supports in communities. schools.

The Administration is committing total funding of $1 billion over five years to increase the number of mental health professionals in schools. The first round of funding, $280 million, will take the form of a series of competitive grants aimed at strengthening the recruitment and training of school staff in mental health.

“For too long, schools have lacked the resources to hire enough school mental health care providers, while at the same time, educators are often the first to notice when a student is slipping academically or is struggling due to mental health issues,” the US Secretary of Education said. Education Miguel Cardona said in a statement.

“We know that children and young people cannot do their best when they are suffering from depression, anxiety and other mental health problems, whether due to community violence, social isolation due to the pandemic, loss of loved ones, bullying, harassment or This bipartisan Safer Communities Act funding will help schools raise the bar on student mental health by recruiting, preparing, hiring and training highly trained school-based mental health care providers, including in underserved communities and for students such as multilingual learners. and those from low-income backgrounds and rural communities, where access to these services may be limited.

How can schools get mental health grants?

Schools were able to apply for funds from two separate grants – the School Mental Health Services Grant, a program to increase the number of mental health staff in schools, and the Professional Demonstration Grant for Mental Health Services, which will encourage schools to partner with colleges and universities in the training of school mental health personnel.

Grants are limited and awarded based on demonstrated need. The Department of Education plans to award approximately 150 School Mental Health Service Grants and 250 Mental Health Service Professional Demonstration Grants to schools to help deal with the crisis.

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